Miscarriages of Justice

Causes, consequences and remedies

It is crucial for criminal justice practitioners to understand miscarriages of justice. This text provides an up-to-date and comprehensive analysis of miscarriages of justice, highlighting difficulties in defining them, examining their dimensions, forms, scale and impact and exploring key cases and their causes.

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Miscarriages of justice occur far more frequently than we realise and have the power to ruin people’s lives. It is crucial for criminal justice practitioners to understand them, given significant developments in recent years in law and police codes of practice.

This text, part of the Key themes in policing textbook series, is written by three highly experienced authors with expertise in the fields of criminal investigation, forensic psychology and law and provides an up-to-date and comprehensive analysis of miscarriages of justice. They highlight difficulties in defining miscarriages of justice, examine their dimensions, forms, scale and impact and explore key cases and their causes. Discussing informal and formal remedies against miscarriages of justice, such as campaigns and the role of the media and the Court of Appeal and the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC), they highlight criticism of the activities and decision-making of the latter and examine changes to police investigation in this area.

Designed to incorporate ‘evidence-based policing’, each chapter provides questions reflecting on the issues raised in the text and suggestions for further reading.

Dr. Sam Poyser is Senior Lecturer in Criminology, Criminal Justice and Policing at York St John University. Her primary area of research is miscarriages of justice and the learning opportunities they present for criminal investigators. More generally, she has conducted research into victims’ experiences of injustice and has published extensively in the areas of policing, investigation and criminal justice.

Dr Angus Nurse is Associate Professor, Environmental Justice at Middlesex University School of Law. His main research interests are in access to justice, critical criminal justice, animal and human rights law and green criminology and he has published extensively in these fields.

Dr Rebecca Milne is a Professor of Forensic Psychology and Founder of the Centre of Forensic Interviewing at the Institute of Criminal Justice Studies, University of Portsmouth. She is also a chartered forensic psychologist, Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society. Rebecca has published widely in the fields of criminal investigation, interviewing and evidence.

Author/Editor details at time of book publication.