Decolonising Social Work in Finland

Racialisation and Practices of Care

This book examines the contemporary social care realities and practices of Finland, a small nation with a history enmeshed in social relations as both colonizer and colonized.

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This book examines the contemporary social care realities and practices of Finland, a small nation with a history enmeshed in social relations as both colonizer and colonized. Decolonising Social Work in Finland:

• Interrogates coloniality, racialization and diversity in the context of Finnish social work and social care.

• Brings together racialized and mainstream white Finnish researchers, activists, and community members to challenge relations of epistemic violence on racialized populations in Finland.

• Critically unpacks colonial views of care and wellbeing.

It will be essential reading for international scholars and students in the fields of Social Work, Sociology, Indigenous Studies, Health Sciences, Social Sciences, and Education.

Introduction and Chapter 10 available Open Access under CC-BY-NC-ND licence.

Kris Clarke is Professor of Social Work at the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Helsinki. Her research interests centre on decolonisation, structural social work, LGBTQ+ issues in social work and the significance of place and social memory. She is currently working on a study about the history of the AIDS epidemic in Central California.

Leece Lee-Oliver (Blackfeet/Choctaw) is a decolonial scholar and activist whose work is dedicated to understanding how Native American, Indigenous and marginalised peoples experience and respond to national policies and societal beliefs that pose challenges to their sovereignty, safety and security. Her teaching and writing reflect the transgressive political work of Third World liberation scholars. Leece’s scholarship pays homage to the legacies of resistance emergent in strategically marginalised communities and highlights how Native Americans draw on cultural traditions to address anti-‘Indian’ violence and promote and protect sovereignty today. The heart of her work examines US and colonial laws to explore genocidal state violence and today’s epidemic rate of violence against Native American women and girls, most notably in the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women, Girls and People (MMIWGP) pandemic. Leece is Chair of the Board of Directors of the Fresno American Indian Health Project, where her work serves to support Indigenous-based wellness and education practices for ‘urban Indian’ and California Native Americans. Leece is an Associate Professor of American Indian Studies and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Director of American Indian Studies at California State University, Fresno.

Satu Ranta-Tyrkkö is Lecturer at the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland. She has been interested in post- and decolonial social work, local global continuums, and interfaces and confluences of social work and art, as well as environmental issues, throughout her research career. Recently, she has worked especially on issues of social and ecological sustainability, social work futures and eco-social work.

Author/Editor details at time of book publication.