A different Women, Peace and Security is possible? Intersectionality in Women, Peace and Security resolutions and national action plans

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Sarah SmithLondon School of Economics and Political Science, UK

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Elena B. StavrevskaLondon School of Economics and Political Science, UK

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This article examines the incorporation of intersectional perspectives – using intersectionality as theory and method – into the Women, Peace and Security agenda. We conduct a content analysis of the ten Women, Peace and Security resolutions and 98 current Women, Peace and Security national action plans. The analysis shows that intersectionality has been integrated into the Women, Peace and Security agenda to only a limited extent, despite more recent trends towards referencing the term in policy documents. Even where intersectionality or intersectional concerns are referenced, these tend to reinforce hegemonic categorisations based on sex difference. We therefore argue that policy and practice ought to incorporate intersectionality in its view of both power and identities, as well as in its organising frameworks, and thereby take into consideration how intersecting systems of power affect lived experiences for groups and individuals, their access to justice, and their ability to exercise agency.

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Sarah SmithLondon School of Economics and Political Science, UK

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Elena B. StavrevskaLondon School of Economics and Political Science, UK

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