Falling through the care cracks: younger people in long-term care homes

Author: Poland Lai1
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  • 1 York University, Canada
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The COVID-19 casualties in long-term care homes (nursing homes) around the world are usually described as our collective failure in care towards older adults. The plight of younger long-term care residents appears to be forgotten in the midst of long-term care tragedies. This article summarises a small number of key informant interviews (conducted in 2017) that shed light on why younger adults reside in long-term care homes in Ontario, Canada. To put it simply, the younger residents have nowhere to go. Diverting younger people with disabilities from long-term care will help alleviate pressures on long-term care systems as respective governments race to reform them.

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  • 1 York University, Canada

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