Rendering them responsible: victim-survivors experiences of Clare’s Law and domestic violence disclosure schemes

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Charlotte Barlow University of Central Lancashire (UCLAN), UK

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Sandra Walklate University of Liverpool, UK
Monash University, Australia

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Nicole Renehan Durham University, UK

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This article presents empirical findings from a British Academy funded project concerned to explore victim-survivor experiences of domestic violence disclosure schemes (DVDS) in the UK. In so doing it draws on the concept of responsibilisation as one way of making sense of the experiences reported. It goes on to suggest a note of caution for the development of these schemes in other jurisdictions, since the failure to take account of victim-survivor voices in relation to DVDS in the UK has contributed to such schemes rendering victim-survivors responsible.

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Charlotte Barlow University of Central Lancashire (UCLAN), UK

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Sandra Walklate University of Liverpool, UK
Monash University, Australia

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Nicole Renehan Durham University, UK

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