Women in low intensity political conflict (through the lives of Kashmiri women)

Author:
Mehak MajeedIslamic University of Science and Technology, India

Search for other papers by Mehak Majeed in
Current site
Google Scholar
Close
Restricted access
Get eTOC alerts
Rights and permissions Cite this article

The analysis of gender in conflict and fragile situations is an emerging area of research. Little to no attention has been paid to it up until very recently. There is scant scholarly work available that directly addresses this issue, and there is no research on the relationship between gender and low intensity conflict in Kashmir. It is in this light that the current research note has been written. It traces the broad impact that conflict has had on the lives of women living in the Kashmir region, the conflict centric part of Jammu and Kashmir. Through this research note it is established that the women in Kashmir have been exposed to the shock of unpredicted fragility, and the study is further endorsed by some instantial ethnographic case studies. These shocks have impacted them economically, psychologically and socially. Generations of women have been suffering from the negative impact of the conflict. Alhough disastrous for the most part, women have gradually developed some resilience. With time more and more Kashmiri women have been striving towards gaining economic independence by learning skills, by the acquisition of education and by being gainfully employed.

  • Acemoglu, D. and Robinson, J.A. (2000) Political losers as a barrier to economic development, The American Economic Review, 90(2): 12630. doi: 10.1257/aer.90.2.126

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Aris, R., Hague, G. and Mullender, A. (2004) Is anyone Listening? Accountability and Women Survivors of Domestic Violence, London: Routledge.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bannerji, H. (2016) Patriarchy in the era of neoliberalism: the case of India, Social Scientist, 44(3/4): 327.

  • Batool, E., Butt, I., Mushtaq, S., Rashid, M. and Rather, N. (2016) Do You Remember Kunan Poshpora?, New Delhi: Zubaan.

  • Beechey, V. (1979) On patriarchy, Feminist Review, 3(1): 6682. doi: 10.1057/fr.1979.21

  • Blackstone, A.M. (2003) Gender roles and society, in J.R. Miller, R.M. Lerner and L.B. Schiamberg (eds) An Encyclopedia of Children, Families, Communities, and Environments, Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, pp 33538.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Buvinic, M., Das Gupta, M., Casabonne, U. and Verwimp, P. (2013) Violent conflict and gender inequality: an overview, World Bank Research Observer, 28(1): 11038, doi: 10.1093/wbro/lks011.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Chakravarti, U. (1993) Conceptualising Brahmanical patriarchy in early India: gender, caste, class and state, Economic and Political Weekly, 57985.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Dawes, A. (1994) The emotional impact of political violence, in A. Dawes and D. Donald (eds) Childhood and Adversity: Psychological Perspectives from South African Research, Cape Town: David Philip Publishers, pp 17799.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Gibson‐Davis, C.M., Magnuson, K., Gennetian, L.A. and Duncan, G.J. (2005) Employment and the risk of domestic abuse among low‐income women, Journal of Marriage and Family, 67(5): 114968.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ickes, W. (1993) Traditional gender roles: do they make, and then break, our relationships?, Journal of Social Issues, 49: 71. doi: 10.1111/j.1540-4560.1993.tb01169.x

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Ledin, A., Bornmann, L., Gannon, F. and Wallon, G. (2007) A persistent problem: traditional gender roles hold back female scientists, EMBO Reports, 8(11): 98287. doi: 10.1038/sj.embor.7401109

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Lundgren-Gothlin, E. (1996) Sex and existence simone de beauvoir’s the second sex.

  • Mies, M. (2014) Patriarchy and Accumulation on a World Scale: Women in the International Division of Labour, London: Bloomsbury Publishing.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Nason-Clark, N. (2020) When terror strikes at home: the interface between religion and domestic violence, in Family Rights and Religion, Abingdon: Routledge, pp 24552.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Omvedt, G. (1986) ‘Patriarchy’: the analysis of women’s oppression, Insurgent Sociologist, 13(3): 3050. doi: 10.1177/089692058601300305

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Pande, R., Malhotra, A., Mathur, S., Mehta, M., Malhotra, A., Lycette, M.A., Kambou, S.D., Magar, V., Gay, J. and Lary, H. (2006) Son Preference and Daughter Neglect in India, Washington, DC: International Center for Research on Women.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Pereira, B., Andrew, G., Pednekar, S., Pai, R., Pelto, P. and Patel, V. (2007) The explanatory models of depression in low income countries: listening to women in India, Journal of Affective Disorders, 102(1–3): 20918. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2006.09.025

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Razvi, M. and Roth, G.L. (2004) Socio-economic development and gender inequality in India, DeKalb, IL: Northern Illinois University, https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED492144.pdf.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Walby, S. (1989) Theorising patriarchy, Sociology, 23(2): 21334. doi: 10.1177/0038038589023002004

  • Zia, A. (2019) Resisting Disappearance: Military Occupation and Women’s Activism in Kashmir, Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press.

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
Mehak MajeedIslamic University of Science and Technology, India

Search for other papers by Mehak Majeed in
Current site
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Content Metrics

May 2022 onwards Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 116 116 17
Full Text Views 175 175 71
PDF Downloads 147 147 64

Altmetrics

Dimensions