Intensive care, autoethnography and solidarity

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Sophie SavageUniversity of the West of England, UK

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This article begins by providing a personal narrative of the intensive nature of the care between myself and my mother in the context of living through childhood liver disease, transplantation and cancer, often in hospital far from home. Psychosocial studies is argued to offer reflexive ways of working to process complexity and trauma, particularly autoethnography. The strength of working with an educator who has a relational approach to teaching, demonstrating transparency in approaches to writing and learning and sharing rich personal narratives, is explored. Crociani-Windland’s approach to practising an intimate pedagogy is found to be personally transformational and echoes through my current practice as an early-career academic.

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Sophie SavageUniversity of the West of England, UK

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