Universal Credit, ubiquitous conditionality and its implications for social citizenship

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Peter Dwyer University of York, UK

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Sharon Wright University of Glasgow, UK

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Between 2013 and 2017 Universal Credit replaces six means-tested working age benefits. Backed by a punitive system of tiered sanctions and fines, Universal Credit represents a major expansion and intensification of personalised behavioural conditionality and indicates the ubiquity of conditionality at the heart of twenty-first century UK social citizenship.

Peter Dwyer University of York, UK

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Sharon Wright University of Glasgow, UK

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