Policy & Politics
Advancing knowledge in public and social policy

Intersectoral partnerships, the knowledge economy and intangible assets

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  • 1 Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, UK
  • | 2 Centre for Psycho-Social Studies, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
  • | 3 School of Integrated Health, University of Westminster, UK
  • | 4 School of Sociology, University of the West of England, Bristol
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Arguably, partnerships emerged to address knowledge deficits inherent in other modes of coordination, in understanding between different agencies and arms of government (‘silo mentality’), and between government and the people it serves. As an increasingly prevalent form of governance, there is concern about whether partnerships produce benefits that contribute to the public good. This article considers their value in producing intangible assets in the form of knowledge. Tacit, embodied knowledge enhances an individual's capacity to act. Using the concept of intangible assets, we propose a more relational approach to understanding governance that challenges the current instrumentalist thinking within the UK Labour government's modernisation agenda.

  • 1 Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, UK
  • | 2 Centre for Psycho-Social Studies, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
  • | 3 School of Integrated Health, University of Westminster, UK
  • | 4 School of Sociology, University of the West of England, Bristol

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