The rise and fall of neighbourhood in the New Labour era

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Catherine Durose Local Governance Research Unit, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK

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James Rees Third Sector Research Centre, University of Birmingham, UK

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‘Neighbourhood’ was a key political and administrative concept for the New Labour administration and was the spatial focus for a proliferation of initiatives in the early period. Yet since 2006, the appeal and use of ‘neighbourhood’ have waned as evidence of the impact of neighbourhood interventions over the last decade has emerged, along with active re-scaling of policy for regeneration and economic development. This article seeks to draw out why ‘neighbourhood’ was important to the New Labour project, to examine why and how this changed over the course of the New Labour administration, and to explore new agendas emerging in policy for sub-national governance.

Catherine Durose Local Governance Research Unit, De Montfort University, Leicester, UK

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James Rees Third Sector Research Centre, University of Birmingham, UK

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