Applying collective action frameworks to analyse local-level collaboration for electric vehicle-related policies

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Aaron Deslatte Indiana University Bloomington, USA

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Michael D Siciliano University of Illinois at Chicago, USA

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Rachel M. Krause University of Kansas, USA

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Many of the most pernicious contemporary urban problems require local governments to organise collectively across jurisdictions and reorganise or coordinate internally across bureaucratic silos. Climate change, for example, is a complex system phenomenon impacting a range of interconnected socio-environmental systems in a region, such as water, transportation and energy infrastructures which may not be directly under the control of a single department or government. This often requires managers and policymakers to coordinate policy responses across siloed units within governments and through network-based arrangements across governments. Theories of polycentricity and collective action have long drawn attention to the barriers and opportunities of collaboration and multilevel governance in fashioning adequate responses to complex problems. However, these approaches typically fail to explicate the relationships or interactions between internal and external collaboration risks and the institutional mechanisms for ameliorating them. This article empirically explores this relationship between functional collective action (collaboration across departmental units within a single government) and intergovernmental collective action (collaboration across governments). Situated in the context of climate adaptation and electric vehicle (EV) policy efforts in cities, the article highlights the need for greater scholarly attention more broadly to the development of institutional collective action theory.

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Aaron Deslatte Indiana University Bloomington, USA

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Michael D Siciliano University of Illinois at Chicago, USA

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Rachel M. Krause University of Kansas, USA

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