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Drawing on prisoners’ accounts, this article explores how mitigation strategies adopted to contain the spread of the virus in prison shaped their everyday prison life. The article, using Stauffer’s concept of ethical loneliness, sheds light on the different ways in which a sense of abandonment was experienced by 26 detained individuals interviewed in a prison in Northern Italy, with a focus on the role of the State regarding the measures implemented (and not implemented) and, on an everyday basis, those of the prison staff. Participants’ narratives tell us how, even during the dramatic emergency of the pandemic, prisoners were conceived as stigmatised and otherised individuals where the issue of security, far from being understood in terms of health protection, continued to take on repressive connotations.

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Since the 1970s, important struggles were won to improve the ‘publicness’ of gender-based violence (GBV) in Norway. Since 2000, the Ministry of Justice has coordinated policy work to combat GBV for the Norwegian government. In 2010, a Shelter Act made the provision of domestic violence shelters by local governments mandatory. This article turns to the question of how a public responsibility for GBV was established, and how dedicated public policy, legislation, funding, and services were subsequently realised. This article identifies the crucial actors, factors, and conditions that have had the greatest influence on agenda-setting, policy development and decision making in the policy cycle. Analysis is based on 22 interviews, policy analysis and previous Norwegian studies that have theorised about the success, how it came about, and the decisive factors in achieving change. Participants of this study were academics, activists, specialist service providers, politicians, lawyers, survivor-advocates, and political advisors. In exploring campaigning for change with participants, the study uncovered fault lines within gender equality and violence scholarship and public policy in Norway that may help explain why GBV is still commonplace. The article offers future directions for policy and research that reflect on these discursive exclusions and normative assumptions.

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Convict Criminology is based on the belief that the convict’s voice has been traditionally marginalized in scholarship and policy debates, and that its inclusion can positively impact the fields of corrections, criminology, criminal justice, and policy making.

Designed for students worldwide, Introduction to Convict Criminology is the first sole-authored book to organize and explain current scholarship on this subject, and how it applies to the fields of corrections, criminology, and criminal justice in an accessible manner. From activism to the emergence of undergraduate programs in jails and prisons, it provides a clear guide to the complexities of the field. It features:

• in-depth discussion of the challenges and solutions that Convict Criminology has focused on;

• exhibit boxes;

• end-of-book keywords;

• Publisher’s companion web page that includes test questions -including multiple choice, short answer and essay format.

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This chapter reviews the discipline’s growth and answers 14 basic interrelated questions that people unfamiliar with this subject may have about its origins and significance.

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This chapter reflects upon the role of activism in the Convict Criminology (CC) context. Many people affiliated with the CC perspective have, in one way or another, long participated in progressive-leaning political activity in support of CC. The chapter outlines what CC members and supporters have done, where they have made contributions, and the specific ways that this activity can be improved. In sum, this chapter explores, but is not limited to, the differing political aspects of CC praxis.

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This chapter provides an overview of the instances and challenges when criminologists, convicts, and formerly incarcerated individuals team up to produce scholarly work. It includes the various reasons why this occurs, the challenges that these people experience, and suggestions on how this kind of activity can be facilitated. The chapter also reviews the emergence of the scholarly journal, Journal of Prisoners on Prison.

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Convict Criminology is based on the belief that the convict’s voice has been traditionally marginalized in scholarship and policy debates, and that its inclusion can positively impact the fields of corrections, criminology, criminal justice, and policy making.

Designed for students worldwide, Introduction to Convict Criminology is the first sole-authored book to organize and explain current scholarship on this subject, and how it applies to the fields of corrections, criminology, and criminal justice in an accessible manner. From activism to the emergence of undergraduate programs in jails and prisons, it provides a clear guide to the complexities of the field. It features:

• in-depth discussion of the challenges and solutions that Convict Criminology has focused on;

• exhibit boxes;

• end-of-book keywords;

• Publisher’s companion web page that includes test questions -including multiple choice, short answer and essay format.

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Convict criminology (CC) is based on the belief that the convict’s voice has been traditionally ignored or marginalized in scholarship and policy debates, and that its inclusion can positively impact the fields of corrections, criminology, criminal justice, and policy making.

Designed for students, scholars, and activists worldwide this is the first sole-authored book to comprehensively explain the CC approach to scholarship, teaching, mentorship, and prison and criminal justice activism. It reviews the history and scholarship on this engaging field and the challenges that the approach has encountered. It features:

• exhibit boxes;

• end-of-chapter keywords;

• test questions - including multiple choice, short answer and essay format.

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This chapter explores numerous aspects regarding mentoring in general, mentoring formerly incarcerated people earning university education, and how mentoring has evolved in the Convict Criminology approach, including: pathways to mentoring in Convict Criminology; challenges with CC mentoring; and other problems with mentorship.

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