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Health and social care services and systems increasingly promote both interprofessional practice and person-centred care. This discussion first examines the clinical and community-based contexts for providing interprofessional practice and person-centred care through the lens of personal, interpersonal, interprofessional and organisational values. Emerging conflicts among values are highlighted using the concept of moral distress, with examples from US and Canadian settings. The comparison then moves to the systems level, examining different US and Canadian contexts for improving the quality and reducing the cost of care. Finally, implications and applications are presented, focusing on interrelationships among the individual, interprofessional team and organisation.

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This article explores findings from a qualitative participatory study with asylum seekers in Ireland employed in the healthcare sector during the COVID-19 pandemic. By extending an intersectional analysis framework, we demonstrate how the vulnerability of care workers living within the international protection accommodation system ‘under the care’ of the state intersects with power exercised by the neoliberal care market and is compounded by global health controls instituted during the pandemic. Participants reveal a lack of autonomy and forms of precarity that were not faced by other care workers, particularly increased risk of exposure to COVID-19 and multiple forms of stigma.

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While welfare states and work organisations often provide policies to facilitate a reconciliation of paid work and informal care, the literature pays little attention to employees’ actual capabilities to engage with such policies. In this article, we apply the capabilities approach to interview data from managers and employees in the Netherlands to understand employees’ use or non-use of the policies. We found that job flexibility may help workers reconcile work and care in the short run but that respondents with greater job flexibility reported more health problems than respondents with less flexibility, which calls into question the sustainability of these policies.

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Using a propensity score matching approach, this study evaluates the effect of caring on the physical health, mental health and subjective well-being of Chilean older people. The average treatment effect was not significant in any of the outcomes to physical health. However, older carers – and those who care intensely – were more likely to have depressive and anxious symptomatology and lower life satisfaction than older non-carers. Interventions should consider strategies that favour mental health and avoid caregiver burden, considering the interaction between caring and the challenges of ageing. This could improve the quality of life of carers and those being cared for.

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Sleep has been recognised as compromised in dementia care. This study aims to represent the experiences and needs of informal carers via sleep-related accounts. Retrospective interviews were conducted with 20 carers concerning sleep changes across the trajectory of dementia care. Key interactive narratives were around: ‘sleep as my sacrifice’; tensions between identities of being a ‘sleeper’ versus ‘guardian’; and ‘sleep as a luxury’. Maintaining healthy sleep and preferable sleep practices is challenging while balancing the responsibilities of dementia-related care. Acknowledging sleep as a sociological practice enables a greater understanding of carers’ nuanced experience and support needs.

Open access