Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 236 items for :

  • Quantitative Methods and Statistics x
Clear All

Spain is one of the eight EU-27 countries that failed to reduce early school leaving (ESL) below 10% in 2020, and now faces the challenge of achieving a rate below 9% by 2030. The determinants of this phenomenon are usually studied using cross-sectional data at the micro level and without differentiation by gender. In this study, we analyse it for the first time for Spain using panel data (between 2002 and 2020), taking into account the high regional inequalities at the macroeconomic level and the masculinisation of the phenomenon. The results show a positive relationship between ESL and socio-economic variables such as the adolescent fertility rate, immigration, unemployment or the weight of the industrial and construction sectors in the regional economy, with significant gender differences that invite us to discuss educational policies. Surprisingly, youth unemployment has only small but significant impact on female ESL.

Restricted access

While a vast number of studies confirm the transmission of labour-market disadvantages from one generation to the next, less is known about how parents’ interconnected labour-market pathways co-evolve and shape the opportunities and obstacles for their children’s future careers. This study uses a multidimensional view of intergenerational transmission by describing the most typical pathways of parents’ occupational careers and assesses how these patterns are associated with their children’s labour-market outcomes. Drawing on Swedish longitudinal register data, we used multichannel sequence analysis to follow a cohort of people born in 1985 (n = 72,409) and their parents across 26 years. We identified four parental earning models, differentiating between (1) dual earners with high wages, (2) dual earners with low-wage, (3) one-and-a-half-earners and (4) mother as the main breadwinner. Regression analysis shows strong intergenerational transmission among the most advantageous trajectories, with education as a key determinant for young people to become less dependent on family resources. This study stresses the importance of intra-couple perspectives in life course research to understand how inequalities are shaped and preserved across generations.

Restricted access

This paper undertakes an analysis and discussion of the methodological challenges and insights derived from three longitudinal qualitative studies, all conducted in Chile during the COVID-19 pandemic and subject to comprehensive theoretical-methodological reflection processes centred on their respective designs. This analysis makes a significant contribution to interdisciplinary discussions within social research, with a particular emphasis on longitudinal trajectories.

First, we present a comparative analysis of three studies in social work, utilising Saldaña’s questions addressing changes and learning in longitudinal studies. The first study explores the labour trajectories of researchers, the second focuses on the educational trajectories of students, and the last examines therapeutic alliance trajectories between social workers and families within the child protection system.

Following this, we delve into the methodological decisions made by the research group during the execution of these longitudinal studies. This encompasses an examination of participant involvement, temporal definitions of the adopted designs, and the most suitable methodological tools for analysing change processes over time. The outcomes of this comparative analysis reveal the distinctive characteristics of the three longitudinal studies, providing insights into how the time dimension is explored within them. We highlight key criteria essential for consideration in longitudinal qualitative research, particularly regarding participants and methodology.

In conclusion, we advocate for an expanded reflection within the realm of longitudinal qualitative methodology, encompassing aspects such as design choices, approaches to data analysis, integration of technology in information processing, and strategies for maintaining participant engagement.

Open access

Scientific research ethics are challenged today by the risk of misusing research results that could adversely affect or harm both individuals and their environment. In the ethics literature, such risks have been linked to the possibility of research results falling into the wrong hands, that is, for criminal or terrorist purposes. However, crime data misuse can also affect policy makers’ decisions and lead to discrimination, stigmatization, harassment and intimidation of citizens. From a two-fold perspective, this chapter examines the potential misuse of crime data caused by policy decisions: (1) outlining the ethical scope of potential misuses in European security research; and (2) proposing recommendations to minimize this risk based on a ‘Mutual Distrust Model’ between researchers and policy makers.

Restricted access
Authors: and

This chapter explores the potential for administrative data to improve police policy and decision making by focusing on how to incorporate a critical reflection into the analysis and interpretation of administrative data by understanding its construction. To do this, we focus on Police Recorded Crime as the key source of administrative data in policing in England and Wales. We then evaluate where policing is currently in terms of understanding the need for and having the skills to undertake this critical reflection, based on work undertaken with 60 police analysts from the North of England in 2018/19 as part of the N8 Policing Research Partnership. Finally, we look to the future and raise the issue of the place of the police analysts in the policing institution, considering what they currently contribute and what they could contribute to police policy and decision making.

Restricted access

With the rise of evidence-informed approaches to criminal justice, new models of data-driven decision making and the emergence of predictive analytics and other new tools for understanding and employing crime data, the field of crime research has grown substantially over the past decade. The fuel that drives that growth is data. In this edited collection, we present a comprehensive volume of chapters from some of the leading crime scientists from around the world. Researchers, crime analysts and others working with crime data from across four continents and seven countries provide rich discussions of some of the strengths, perils and opportunities provided by the range of data sources, tools, techniques and topics now available. Aimed at a diverse audience – including students, academic researchers, police practitioners, crime analysts and public policy makers – our goal in this book is to make crime data and analysis accessible and interesting. This book will thus appeal to readers who are interested in learning more about the varieties of data types and sources that can and is informing contemporary criminal justice research.

Restricted access

Social network analysis (SNA) is an approach concerned with analysing networks of relations and interactions among a defined set of actors. In recent years, SNA has become known as a useful tool for analysing a wide range of criminal networks, including networks of serious financial crime. However, using SNA in the study of crime is hindered by the aim of actors involved in these to conceal their interactions, making data collection complicated. These complications stem from issues with data availability, validity and reliability. To tackle these issues, we first introduce a framework for thinking about six aspects of network data collection: nodes, ties, attributes, levels, dynamics and context. In the light of this framework, we subsequently review three types of data sources usable for analysing financial crime networks in the context of the United Kingdom. These data sources are documents accompanying Deferred Prosecution Agreements, enforcement case files and commercial transaction data. We illustrate the contents of each of these data sources together with their potential for extracting network data and the types of conclusions that can be drawn through analysing them. These data sources share common problems in being of a secondary non-scientific nature and being prone to contain missing information. In conclusion, we illustrate further uses of SNA and possible extensions of the introduced data sources to other types of criminal networks and jurisdictions beyond the United Kingdom.

Restricted access
Editors: and

Crime research has grown substantially over the past decade, with a rise in evidence-informed approaches to criminal justice, statistics-driven decision-making and predictive analytics. The fuel that has driven this growth is data – and one of its most pressing challenges is the lack of research on the use and interpretation of data sources.

This accessible, engaging book closes that gap for researchers, practitioners and students. International researchers and crime analysts discuss the strengths, perils and opportunities of the data sources and tools now available and their best use in informing sound public policy and criminal justice practice.

Restricted access

With the rise of evidence-informed approaches to criminal justice, new models of data-driven decision making and the emergence of predictive analytics and other new tools for understanding and employing crime data, the field of crime research has grown substantially over the past decade. The fuel that drives that growth is data. In this edited collection, we present a comprehensive volume of chapters from some of the leading crime scientists from around the world. Researchers, crime analysts and others working with crime data from across four continents and seven countries provide rich discussions of some of the strengths, perils and opportunities provided by the range of data sources, tools, techniques and topics now available. Aimed at a diverse audience – including students, academic researchers, police practitioners, crime analysts and public policy makers – our goal in this book is to make crime data and analysis accessible and interesting. This book will thus appeal to readers who are interested in learning more about the varieties of data types and sources that can and is informing contemporary criminal justice research.

Restricted access

With the rise of evidence-informed approaches to criminal justice, new models of data-driven decision making and the emergence of predictive analytics and other new tools for understanding and employing crime data, the field of crime research has grown substantially over the past decade. The fuel that drives that growth is data. In this edited collection, we present a comprehensive volume of chapters from some of the leading crime scientists from around the world. Researchers, crime analysts and others working with crime data from across four continents and seven countries provide rich discussions of some of the strengths, perils and opportunities provided by the range of data sources, tools, techniques and topics now available. Aimed at a diverse audience – including students, academic researchers, police practitioners, crime analysts and public policy makers – our goal in this book is to make crime data and analysis accessible and interesting. This book will thus appeal to readers who are interested in learning more about the varieties of data types and sources that can and is informing contemporary criminal justice research.

Restricted access