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The book seeks to examine the ways that digital information technologies influence human perception and experience. Contemporary computational media increasingly govern our experience through their capacity for externalizing our knowledge and memories, mining data from our behaviour to influence our decision-making, and also by creating affective encounters such as emotionally rewarding sensory pleasure. Computational platforms and software have become essential to contemporary everyday life and are now almost impossible to eliminate. In this light, it can be argued that the computational media embedded environment is becoming inseparable from embodied human experience. Thus, it can be said that human perception is becoming a product of human–machine symbiosis in a new type of media ecology. In this context, the body becomes a crucial techno-bio entity, which mediates between human perception and machine interaction. Here, affect has become a useful analytical notion with which to explore the dynamism between biological bodily responses and conscious–nonconscious neurodynamic processes. This book, then, aims to avoid overemphasizing or underestimating both neuroreductionism and biological determinism to better understand affective perception of digital moving images. The book will be useful for postgraduate students and researchers who are working on: media and communication theory, film and animation studies, visual culture, science and technology studies, affect theory, the body, and digital humanities.

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The book seeks to examine the ways that digital information technologies influence human perception and experience. Contemporary computational media increasingly govern our experience through their capacity for externalizing our knowledge and memories, mining data from our behaviour to influence our decision-making, and also by creating affective encounters such as emotionally rewarding sensory pleasure. Computational platforms and software have become essential to contemporary everyday life and are now almost impossible to eliminate. In this light, it can be argued that the computational media embedded environment is becoming inseparable from embodied human experience. Thus, it can be said that human perception is becoming a product of human–machine symbiosis in a new type of media ecology. In this context, the body becomes a crucial techno-bio entity, which mediates between human perception and machine interaction. Here, affect has become a useful analytical notion with which to explore the dynamism between biological bodily responses and conscious–nonconscious neurodynamic processes. This book, then, aims to avoid overemphasizing or underestimating both neuroreductionism and biological determinism to better understand affective perception of digital moving images. The book will be useful for postgraduate students and researchers who are working on: media and communication theory, film and animation studies, visual culture, science and technology studies, affect theory, the body, and digital humanities.

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Taking contemporary military augmented reality systems as its point of departure, this article charts a concept of animation associated with topographic mapping practices. It investigates the historical development of the perceptual and cognitive assemblages from which today’s augmented reality environments partly derive, tracking their genealogy back to eighteenth-century military cartographic enterprises, and even further to seventeenth-century camera obscuras, the key ‘mixed reality’ devices of early modernity that contributed to animating the world as a repository of data. The article discusses how, in this context, the concept of animation should be understood as the world’s rendering as an object of action and influence, associated with a model of perception that was not only predicated on models of geometric rationality but also on ideas of enactive attunement between the observer and its environment. Ultimately, the article develops a concept of animation geared toward rendering the real as supple and plastic for desired transformations.

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Chronoclasms are crises of time that occur when practices and concepts of time come into contradiction. The clash between the sovereign authority of the clock that is the material heartbeat of every computer (and every network) and the multidimensional flow of subatomic interactions enables another time to emerge, the time we call history. Temporal concepts and practices emerge into this third, historical form of time in forms that are themselves historically mutable. Close attention to techniques of animation, specifically solar, surveillance, and financial visualizations and their MPEG codec and generative adversarial network infrastructures, can give privileged entry to analysis of chronoclasm as crisis and as the underpinning structure of time under capital.

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The book seeks to examine the ways that digital information technologies influence human perception and experience. Contemporary computational media increasingly govern our experience through their capacity for externalizing our knowledge and memories, mining data from our behaviour to influence our decision-making, and also by creating affective encounters such as emotionally rewarding sensory pleasure. Computational platforms and software have become essential to contemporary everyday life and are now almost impossible to eliminate. In this light, it can be argued that the computational media embedded environment is becoming inseparable from embodied human experience. Thus, it can be said that human perception is becoming a product of human–machine symbiosis in a new type of media ecology. In this context, the body becomes a crucial techno-bio entity, which mediates between human perception and machine interaction. Here, affect has become a useful analytical notion with which to explore the dynamism between biological bodily responses and conscious–nonconscious neurodynamic processes. This book, then, aims to avoid overemphasizing or underestimating both neuroreductionism and biological determinism to better understand affective perception of digital moving images. The book will be useful for postgraduate students and researchers who are working on: media and communication theory, film and animation studies, visual culture, science and technology studies, affect theory, the body, and digital humanities.

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The chapter analyses face-swapped deepfakes in moving images, focusing particularly on two different applications: ‘the public speech’ and ‘the porn scene’. Face-swap technologies generate fears about their abuse: for example, in connection with fake news, advertisements, or hate crime strategies. The fear is that epistemic claims (‘He said this’, ‘She did that’) in a medium that is historically associated with authenticity may affect people differently from other media (writing, audio, still images). The chapter critically questions the affect and the temporality of deepfakes, and analyses what it is like to be depicted in a deepfaked face-swapped animation. It draws on the interrelation between affect and animation, and outlines the medial and attentional ecologies of digitized bodies. Deleuze and Guattari’s ‘faciality’, Bernard Stiegler’s ‘tertiary memory’, and Mark B.N. Hansen’s notions of temporality (‘life’ and ‘artificial time’) are used to theorize about the affect of face-swaps in deepfakes.

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This article aims to theorize the efficacy of fake news and its epitome, the deepfake, in terms of the technicity of the internet. On this account, fake news is triggered and informed by the disjoining of image from the vaster causally efficacious and embodied environment that would normally inform it. The author draws on philosopher Alfred North Whitehead’s conception of propositions as ‘lures for feeling’ that precede belief and judgment in order to argue that fake news operates through a human–technical entanglement which cannot be engaged and critically evaluated by treating the internet as a channel or host of communication. Rather than just toxic content that happens to circulate on the internet, fake news is a product of the internet as socio-technical machine: the combination of superficial content and time-critical reception channels the capture of embodied logic into the genesis of purely actual images efficacious in a well-nigh automatic way. This socio-technical capture of embodiment operates in the service of what is here called the perfect simulacrum: an image that is not received by being embodied but rather dictates its own embodied reception as pure, unanchored ‘presentational immediacy.’

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Animation, the Body, and Affect
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Computational media govern our experiences by externalizing our knowledge and memories, mining data from our behaviour to influence our decision-making and creating emotionally rewarding and sensory pleasures. But does that mean human perception is becoming a product of human-machine symbiosis in this new media ecology?

This ground-breaking collection explores the ways in which digital information technologies form and influence human perception and experience. Examining the relationship between technological reductionism and the body, it takes on board discursive perspectives from the humanities and brings digital media, affect and body studies into conversation with one another.

Written by pioneering authors in the field, this book expands our understanding of human perception, animation, technology and the body.

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The book seeks to examine the ways that digital information technologies influence human perception and experience. Contemporary computational media increasingly govern our experience through their capacity for externalizing our knowledge and memories, mining data from our behaviour to influence our decision-making, and also by creating affective encounters such as emotionally rewarding sensory pleasure. Computational platforms and software have become essential to contemporary everyday life and are now almost impossible to eliminate. In this light, it can be argued that the computational media embedded environment is becoming inseparable from embodied human experience. Thus, it can be said that human perception is becoming a product of human–machine symbiosis in a new type of media ecology. In this context, the body becomes a crucial techno-bio entity, which mediates between human perception and machine interaction. Here, affect has become a useful analytical notion with which to explore the dynamism between biological bodily responses and conscious–nonconscious neurodynamic processes. This book, then, aims to avoid overemphasizing or underestimating both neuroreductionism and biological determinism to better understand affective perception of digital moving images. The book will be useful for postgraduate students and researchers who are working on: media and communication theory, film and animation studies, visual culture, science and technology studies, affect theory, the body, and digital humanities.

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The book explores how digital information technologies have created a huge impact on human perception and experience by engaging with three key components: animation, the body and affect. Animation in this collection encapsules not only modalities and ‘techniques’ of moving images in both ‘frame-by-frame’ analogue and computer-generated images, but also can be seen as a field of affective perception. We sense animation as an actuality in the mind, as well as seeing it as an illusion on the screen. Such emotional, sensory, and psychological experiences point to the vital role of the body.  In this book, then, the discussion of affect focuses specifically on psycho-physical sensations and neuroscientific accounts to explore the dynamic interaction between human perception and moving images. Yet human perception is not simply a part of the organic body, since the body is bio-socially constituted with the capacity for agency and projecting its own subjectivity onto the environment. Hence, the book seeks to go beyond the debates that dichotomize biological/neuronal reductionism and social constructionism, in order to better understand the range of affective and embodied experiences in the era of digital information society.

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