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Background:

Discourse surrounding Equality, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) has received significant attention within the UK academy and knowledge brokerage contexts, and more recently within academic–policy engagement spaces (Walker et al, 2019a; Fawcett, 2021; GOV.UK, 2021; Morris et al, 2021). Key players in this space identify the need for diversifying academic participation, as well as diversifying knowledges (GOV.UK, 2021; UK Parliament, 2018; UKRI, 2023). However, conceptual and practical insight on embedding EDI principles (and what they mean in this context) within academic–policy engagement processes is missing.

Aims and objectives:

Underpinned by feminist and decolonial epistemological concepts, this article addresses this gap by outlining strategies, and surfacing ways in which EDI within academic–policy engagement is experienced, conceptualised, understood and considered.

Methods:

Two parallel qualitative studies, with a total of 20 semi-structured narrative and realist interviews conducted with marginalised researchers (n=10, Study A) and university based knowledge brokers (n=10, Study B), and a rapid literature review. The analysis used a narrative and thematic framework.

Findings and discussion:

We found a want for EDI to go beyond just diversity of people and representation, towards fostering foundational principles of epistemic justice, equitable access, value-driven engagement and plurality. Academics and knowledge brokers reported both negative and positive experiences within this space that related to known EDI issues. We conclude that EDI cannot be standardised across higher education contexts, and emphasise the need for holistic, relational and plural approaches to EDI across academic–policy engagement systems through a value-led, equitable and ethical lens.

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This commentary calls for GPE to reconsider its neglect of leisure. It traces growing overlaps between leisure and digital economies through the case of fintech in men’s elite football, focusing on the growing issuance of blockchain-based digital tokens by clubs and leagues worldwide since 2018. The fan token example is used to illustrate how locating seemingly esoteric developments more widely in digitisation trends politicises leisure activities. It suggests that a focus on infrastructuring and governing in particular may help draw attention to the politics of contemporary transnational activities that blur the boundaries between sectors as well as work/leisure in the digital age.

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Drawing on a nested qualitative study within REPROVIDE, a randomised controlled trial examining the effectiveness of a group-based domestic abuse perpetrator programme, this article explores accounts of domestic abuse during the COVID-19 pandemic from the perspectives of victims/survivors and perpetrators. Based on interviews with male perpetrators and female survivors, including with partner/ex-partner dyads, our study reveals the gendered effects of the pandemic on abusive perpetrator behaviour.

Findings are presented through themes addressing the different experiences of victims/survivors and perpetrators during the pandemic. Through an exploration of victim/survivor attempts to ameliorate intensified abuse through compliance (Theme 1), the way perpetrators put on a masculine ‘front’ (Theme 2), the gendered burden of domestic responsibilities (Theme 3) and highlighting the importance of continued specialist support (Theme 4), this article contributes to an understanding of gender inequalities underpinning pre-pandemic domestic violence and abuse and how perpetrators utilised inequalities during COVID restrictions. Some dyads reported relationships feeling more settled in the first UK lockdown, however, this was associated with increased opportunities for control that lockdown provided perpetrators. Both parties experienced changes in service responses. We articulate implications for safe working with perpetrators and families during future pandemics or social crises.

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This article highlights carers’ information-related work of caring for community-dwelling older adults living with dementia. Within an institutional ethnography method of inquiry, two sets of interviews with 13 carers and five paid dementia care staff map out the social organisation of carers’ information work. Carers’ information work is organised by timescales of past, present and future. Paid dementia care staff’s work reveals the broader institutional agendas that shape and constrain the ways that family caregivers experience their information work. As carers contend with information that is ‘fluid’ and ambiguous, differing supports are required to agentively support carers’ information needs.

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In this article, perceived benefits, facilitators and challenges of peer support offered for and by people living with dementia are explored by comparing peer support provided by Dementia Lifestyle Coach (DLC) and Dementia Alliance International (DAI). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with interviewees from DLC and DAI. Interview recordings were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Peer support offered by DLC and DAI provided connection and emotional and informational support and promoted living well with dementia. Each programme had unique barriers and facilitators. The article concludes that peer support for and by people living with dementia should be considered in post-diagnostic dementia support programmes.

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Author:

Drawing on and responding to the articles in this special collection, this provocation makes the case that realising justice in education requires a focus on the processes and politics of justice-oriented reform in postcolonial, low- and middle-income counties (LMICs). In implementing reform, it is argued that it is crucial to take account of similarities and differences in context between LMICs. At the heart of reform must be a holistic, coherent and systemic approach at the level of the education system of the institution. Key priorities include reforming the curriculum, investing in educators as agents of change and developing endogenous system leadership that can drive justice-oriented reform. Here, however, it is necessary to engage with the politics of justice-oriented reform, including challenging global, neoliberal agendas, democratising the governance of education and engaging with popular struggles for social, epistemic, transitional and environmental justice.

Open access

In this piece, I use consumption as a lens to argue how urban, middle-class Indians in their middle and later ages are emerging as a distinctive consumer society while rewriting the scripts of growing old in India. This cultural shift is happening at a time when novel modes of ageing are imagined against the backdrop of transnational family arrangements, market-based care and a quest for vitality and autonomy among older Indians, altering the cultural continuities of intergenerational relationships. I show how consumption as a cultural force both expands the expressive capabilities of older persons but, at the same time, imposes disciplinary discourses around the family and social relationships. Overall, I critically reflect on what the ‘downward blurring’ of the ageing self does to the contemporary frameworks of intergenerational relationships in India. I conclude by discussing both the possibility and the (cultural) limit of theories developed in the industrialised West to capture the shifting realities of transitional societies.

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The final chapter shows that, since its creation, Twin Oaks, like most other intentional communities, has sometimes had to cope with high turnover rates. While this is not necessarily a sign of dysfunction, it does raise questions about the long-term dynamics of the collective in general and individual destinies in particular. The chapter thus highlights the existence of a wide range of trajectories within communities, from very long-term residency (until death in the community) to much more temporary stays. It also provides data on the fortunes of communards who chose to return to the outside world, identifies the motivations that led them to make this choice, and concludes that the community experience was not, in the vast majority of cases, a mere frivolous interlude in the course of an individual’s life.

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This chapter contextualizes the community revival that began in the US in the late 1960s, focusing on the diversity of intentional communities that emerged. It proposes to reduce the complexity of the community landscape by distinguishing three elementary ideal types of community: societal, anarchist and identity-based. Finally, it studies the case of a community (The Farm) initially characterized by a form of charismatic domination, but which, over time, evolved towards a societal model.

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