Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 29,265 items for

Author:

This article examines the dialogic relationship between emotional reflexivity and emotional regime as it explores ‘the hukou puzzle’ in China. In theory, migrants in small- to medium-scale cities can transfer their hukou (household registration) to urban areas, yet are unwilling to do so in practice. Relying on six months’ ethnographic fieldwork and 60 in-depth interviews with ethnic migrant performers, this article argues that previous theorisation of the hukou puzzle neglects emotions and assumes migrants are making rational choices to maximise their profits. In reality, different emotions and feelings inform migrants’ reflexivity regarding an opaque migration regime, which highlights the crucial role of how they exercise their reflexivity in emotional and relational ways. Moreover, a neoliberal emotional regime at the Chinese societal level – which emphasises positive energy, happiness and ‘the China Dream’ – also significantly shapes migrants’ emotional reflexivity. This article points to the need to further explore the intersection between emotional reflexivity and emotional regime in relation to migration.

Open access
Author:

This chapter considers the wider community role and potential of the school. It notes the more transactional relationship of schools with community organisations currently. It describes how communities shape schools and teaching now. Overall, the strong possibilities for local government in this connection are considered.

Restricted access
Author:

The chapter sets out for the final time the importance of immediacy, familiarity and involvement for effective governance and leadership. How democracy is lived in local government. Two illustrative case studies are set out to demonstrate what democratic behaviour could look like. An additional Nolan principle is suggested to encourage it.

Restricted access
Author:

This chapter describes the paradox of centralisation: focus on the minister while officials have been progressively weakened; how notions of strategy at national level became anathema and the problems with the backgrounds and self-view of senior officials’ roles, NPM and its current weaknesses and irrelevance, the end of expertise and its consequences, and how ignorance of social and economic processes makes policy realisation weak.

Restricted access
Author:

The chapter introduces the key themes of the book. The outline is made of the twin pushes of academisation and a national policy that has lost sight of the wider world and the communities it is supposed to serve. The structure of the book is set out.

Restricted access
Author:

This sets out the changes, especially since 2010, that have reduced the so-called middle tier in English Education. It sets out the distrust of central government and its contempt for its local counterpart. It details the gradual development over time of a national arrangement and cadre for school improvement and the effects of ‘conversion’ to academy status, including the withering of local authorities. There is a first discussion of MATs and their nature.

Restricted access
Author:

This chapter describes the current functioning of the middle tier in England. It details how school improvement activity is planned and carried out. It outlines the chaotic way that new schools have to be commissioned. Lastly, it describes the changing role of RSCs and how these can be varied by central diktat, open to political lobbying.

Restricted access
Author:

The chapter begins with the limitations of nationally driven policy making in Education. It examines difficulties of realising national prescription and how there are always unforeseeable consequences. The constantly changing market for private companies is explored whose presence helps secrecy, and ends new thinking. The chapter ends with a review of arms-length bodies, their role and that of Ofsted

Restricted access
Author:

This chapter summarises arguments so far about current system weaknesses. It rehearses the need for change, but considers who might want it. It outlines the futility of compete dismantling of current structures and begins to think about how to do it all.

Restricted access