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This pilot study examines the role and impact of a coaching intervention on carers’ lives and well-being, drawing on interview data with 12 carers and two coaches. It shows that carers highly value coaching. Reported benefits include: carers feeling listened to and treated as individuals; increased levels of self-awareness, self-care and confidence; and feeling more empowered, in control and able to make choices. Carers also reported improved relationships with their relatives and reduced feelings of hopelessness and anxiety. Further research is needed to capture the impact of coaching on a larger carer population, the sustainability of impact and cost-effectiveness.

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The article explores methodological and ethical tensions arising from positionality and reflexivity while doing feminist research in a challenging parliamentary setting, specifically one that includes radical-right populist actors that use anti-gender rhetoric. Reflecting upon positionality is vital for qualitative researchers, especially those engaged in critical feminist research, where gendered power hierarchies between researchers and their environment demand daily manoeuvring and subsequent analytical concern. We explore how the gender of the researchers, gender equality as a research topic, our feminist positionalities, and intersectional aspects shaped the research process in the context of the European Parliament. The article contributes to the literature on feminist positionalities and reflexivity by discussing not only the ambiguities emerging from our empirical research choices, such as engaging with radical-right actors, but also the other ‘critical ingredients’ that feminism handles, such as identities, relationships, power and affects, reflecting how they are interwoven with relationships and interactions in the field.

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Bystander intervention is a method of sexual violence prevention aimed at reducing the serious and pervasive issue of sexual assault on college campuses. The current study utilises the reasoned action approach (RAA) to examine potential differences in bystander intervention engagement between college students with exposure or experience related to sexual assault to students with no such history. Students (n=290) from two mid-sized universities completed a survey examining the RAA constructs (instrumental and experiential attitudes, injunctive and descriptive norms, capacity and autonomy), their sexual assault knowledge, and anticipated regret in reference to bystander intervention. Results showed that participants with exposure or experience related to sexual assault had significantly higher behavioural intentions (p=.018; d=.31), instrumental attitudes (p<.001; d=.55), injunctive norms (p=.026; d=.29), capacity (p=.002; d=.40), autonomy (p=.022; d=.28), anticipated regret (p<.001; d=.56), and sexual assault knowledge (p=.018; d=.31). The RAA constructs also explained a significant amount of the variance of intentions for both groups (with exposure/experience adjust R2 =.501; without exposure/experience adjust R2 =.660). The RAA constructs and anticipated regret appear to be important predictors to consider when planning bystander intervention programmes aimed at reducing sexual assault on college campuses.

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Early prevention science (EPS) is a field encompassing recent advances in child development knowledge. This knowledge is increasingly being operationalised and (mis)applied in child protection, with some scholars noting oppressive consequences. This article uses theories of epistemic justice, specifically José Medina’s notion of epistemic friction, to discuss how EPS was accepted and/or resisted in child protection practice and policy in Aotearoa New Zealand, during the 2010s. It draws from a wider doctoral study, including policy analysis (n = 5) and interviews with social workers (n = 24). Analysis suggests that social workers moved between acceptance of and resistance to EPS. Further, they require institutional support to critically engage with alternative knowledges, thereby pursuing broader social and epistemic justice goals. Individual or institutional responsibility and accountability are resisted and problematised; instead, a both/and approach is advocated, allowing for multiple truths.

Open access

Poor working conditions and high employee turnover in eldercare have frequently been addressed over the years. The aim of the study is to examine the relation between work overcommitment and employee well-being and turnover intentions in eldercare and whether leader support and role clarity moderate the relation between overcommitment and employee outcomes. A questionnaire was distributed to workplaces in eight Swedish municipalities. The results show that overcommitment was related to employees’ impaired well-being, as well as to their turnover intentions. We also found that leader support buffered the negative effects of overcommitment. The role clarity was quite high; however, it did not have a moderating effect.

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Mental problems in young people are increasing and recovery proposals from classic biomedical models are not always effective. One of the responses to this has been the Mutual Help Groups, groups made up of people who meet periodically to help each other based on principles such as trust, transversality, the creation of support networks and new possibilities for psychosocial recovery. These possibilities arise from the same people, with the help of others, to have new ways of understanding reality and approaching it, which is called the agency of possibilities. This research aims to understand the contribution that Mutual Aid Groups make to young people’s mental health through group agency. For this, an analysis is carried out through the ‘Event’, an element of the pluralistic ontology of neo-monadism, which is defined as the unification of individualities based on incalculable networks that overlap with each other to generate new questions and new answers. Using thematic analysis as an analysis tool, in-depth interviews were conducted with six young people with mental problems belonging to a Mutual Help Group. There it was found that intentional states broadly explain world-to-mind, mind-to-world and mind-to-mind functional relationships and interactions, which contributes to ontological pluralism as a new paradigm for addressing social problems. Mental health care has long sought to control people. In this sense, negative adaptation guarantees recovery in vain. On the other hand, positive adaptation, from desires, from heterogeneous forces and beliefs, could be a more effective recovery path.

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