Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,462 items for :

  • Sociology of Gender and Sexuality x
Clear All

In this article, we analyse how mediated discourses of toxic friendships echo and reconstruct the category of the toxic friend. We ask: what kind of assumptions does the toxic friendship discourse draw on, and what forms of subjectivity and interpersonal relationships are encouraged? Employing a critical discourse analysis of digital texts, we argue that the discursive category of the toxic friend draws on a simplistic set of classificatory dichotomies distinguishing between the good and the toxic friend. We also suggest that the popular labelling of difficult friendships as ‘toxic’ reflects the contemporary diffusion of the notion of toxicity in contemporary public culture. We contend that this discourse reflects the discursive conflation between therapeutic culture and neoliberal wellness logic, with the figure of the toxic friend constructed in ways that support imperatives for self-care and self-governance. While much of the advice situates friendship as an important personal tie, there is very little encouragement to ‘work’ on these relationships. As such, these discourses offer a reductive, disposable approach to friendship ties that overlooks the complexities and lived experiences of friendship relations.

Full Access

In Western prisons, inmates’ religious conversions are a social fact in which fear plays a predominant role. Based on a qualitative and longitudinal survey conducted over two years in a French prison, this article aims to show how religious fears emerge in the consciousness of non-religious prisoners. Phenomenologically, the empirical data show that these fears arise because of an incapacitating state of anxiety. Over time, life in prison affects the social identity of individuals, their structuring markers and their biographical continuity. But the social mechanisms of anxiety are not those of fear. It is diffuse anxiety that allows the appearance of a new and identified fear. This enigma is interesting for the sociology of knowledge and therefore of socialisation: individuals are not afraid of what they do not know. The survey highlights that the emergence of these fears of God, sin, hell and so on reveals a process of regression of the habitus of the inmates to their primary socialisations. As irrational as they may seem for the frightened themselves, these fears show a structuring potential by interpreting and organising the disconcerting distress of which they are the product. Fear – religious or not – integrates and synthesises anxiety. From that moment, the appearance of fear augurs a gain of psychic, intellectual and finally practical mastery of a situation without which it would have remained unmanageable. This is how intramural trajectories become conversion paths.

Full Access
Author: Gözde Cöbek

Choosing a partner has turned into swiping since the emergence of dating technologies. Today, individuals predominantly choose their partners via dating platforms by swiping their profiles with a quick thumb movement. The literature argues that mate preference is a static and disembodied disposition, where one’s intersectional background plays a role. Focusing on heterosexual individuals’ swiping practices in Turkey, this article aims to challenge this structural argument and suggests an affective approach to online dating. The concept of affect encourages more than a focus on the structures that influence mate choice. Emphasising the body’s capacity to act and be acted on, environments and thought-in-action, it draws attention to different orienting forces involved in swiping. As such focus requires a different methodology, this study uses the walkthrough and video re-enactment techniques to examine the mate selection practice. Based on interviews with 42 individuals who use Tinder and/or OkCupid, it shows how swiping is not only techno-socially shaped but also a bodily practice. Technological design, one’s mood and the sensation that arises through the encounter between the individual and the profile affect swiping decisions which can be both consistent and inconsistent with one’s techno-socially shaped criteria. By suggesting an affective perspective, this article makes both a theoretical and methodological contribution to the field.

Full Access

Written by an interdisciplinary collective of authors, this powerful book documents the largely unknown histories and politics of trans lives, activisms and culture across the post-Yugoslav states.

The volume sheds light on a diversity of gender embodiments and explores how they have navigated the murky waters of war, capitalism and transphobia while forging a niche for themselves within the regional and transnational LGBTQ movements.

By unleashing the knowledge concentrated in trans lives, this book not only resists trans erasures in Eastern Europe, but also underscores the potential for survival, self-transformation, and engagement in politically challenging circumstances.

Full Access

Written by an interdisciplinary collective of authors, this powerful book documents the largely unknown histories and politics of trans lives, activisms and culture across the post-Yugoslav states.

The volume sheds light on a diversity of gender embodiments and explores how they have navigated the murky waters of war, capitalism and transphobia while forging a niche for themselves within the regional and transnational LGBTQ movements.

By unleashing the knowledge concentrated in trans lives, this book not only resists trans erasures in Eastern Europe, but also underscores the potential for survival, self-transformation, and engagement in politically challenging circumstances.

Full Access
Author: Lura Limani

Destabilising the notion of ‘firsts’ when LGBTIQ+ history remains largely unknown or forgotten, this chapter grapples with the emergence of trans narratives in Kosovar media, first during the Yugoslav period and later in post-independence Kosovo. Contradicting both local and regional reports of ‘the first public case’ of a Kosovar to seek the formal recognition of their gender confirmation in 2019, the chapter traces back the first media report of a Kosovar person to undergo gender confirmation surgery back to 1978. Using discursive analysis of media reports and semi-structured interviews, this chapter provides a short chronicle of public accounts of trans experience in Kosovo and critical interventions where facts and lived experience diverge from public accounts. Focusing on the personal accounts of three trans people who came out publicly and some that even transitioned in the public eye, the chapter also provides an insight into the intersectional character of lived trans experience, as well as pointing towards the urgent need to produce knowledge about queer lives and history as a form of epistemic justice.

Full Access

This chapter sets the stage for the volume by providing insights into the ways in which the intensification of trans-related activist engagement has manifested itself in the politically dynamic post-Yugoslav region. We start by entwining our biographical positionalities with major conceptual instruments of contemporary transnational trans studies to both account for the processes that brought us together and carve a niche for our book in Eastern European social sciences and humanities and, in particular, feminist research and queer and trans studies. We then outline the most important political developments through which trans activisms across the region have gained visibility and emancipated themselves from the more generic LGBT initiatives, also shedding a new light on trans lives and artistic endeavours. This has opened a field of political contention that both encompasses and goes beyond activist circles. As we introduce the central arguments of the ensuing chapters, we reflect upon the challenges of conceptual translation within a global economy of knowledge that centralises the Global North and especially Anglo-American trans studies. Facing an intellectual and political scene in which understanding global social relations becomes important for taking trans intellectual work forward, we argue in favour of transnationally informed, but locally embedded and intersectionally sensitive, empirical analysis.

Full Access

Written by an interdisciplinary collective of authors, this powerful book documents the largely unknown histories and politics of trans lives, activisms and culture across the post-Yugoslav states.

The volume sheds light on a diversity of gender embodiments and explores how they have navigated the murky waters of war, capitalism and transphobia while forging a niche for themselves within the regional and transnational LGBTQ movements.

By unleashing the knowledge concentrated in trans lives, this book not only resists trans erasures in Eastern Europe, but also underscores the potential for survival, self-transformation, and engagement in politically challenging circumstances.

Full Access
Author: Bojan Bilić

Over the last few years, the highly charged debates about the role that trans women should play in leftist and feminist struggles have spilt over from the Anglo-American space into the polarised and fragmented field of Serbian activist politics. In the context of rapid impoverishment, omnipresent corruption, and constant erosion of the working class, trans women – one of the most marginalised social groups – have been constructed as an ‘arch-enemy’ provoking painful tensions and draining activist energies. In this chapter I draw upon semi-structured interviews with trans and feminist activists to explore why it is that some strands of Serbian leftist activism – which has had a hard time recovering from the 1990s’ nationalist blow – mark gender difference in such a rigid way that ‘what is socially peripheral’ becomes symbolically central (Hall, 1997) to the point of exclusion, discrimination, and verbal violence. While I focus empirically on the polemics surrounding the activist collective Marks21, whose most visible male members have been particularly vocal about the risks that trans (women’s) emancipation allegedly poses for the precarious achievements of the leftist and feminist movements, I juxtapose it with Praxis, an older Yugoslav Marxist initiative that can hardly boast about its feminist record. Within such an analytical frame, I argue that the capacity of the ‘trans question’ to split the already minuscule left side of the political spectrum is reflective of the long-term conservative and neocolonial dimensions of the Yugoslav/Serbian Left.

Full Access