Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 46 items for :

  • Urban Sociology x
Clear All
Violence at Home, Violence On-Road
Author: Jade Levell

Boys and young men have been previously overlooked in domestic violence and abuse policy and practice, particularly in the case of boys who are criminalised and labelled as gang-involved by the time they reach their teens.

Jade Levell offers radical and important insights into how boys in this context navigate their journey to manhood with the constant presence of violence in their lives, in addition to poverty and racial marginalisation. Of equal interest to academics and front-line practitioners, the book highlights the narratives of these young men and makes practice recommendations for supporting these ‘hidden victims’.

Restricted access
Author: Jade Levell

In this chapter I consider the narratives of the respondents that centred on the early years of their lives, in particular between birth to the end of their pre-teens. In these parts of their stories, the participants described their circumstances at home, experiencing DVA, alongside their emerging engagement with violence in school and on-road. Central to the discussion a contrast between the way they performed masculinity at home (defined by subordinated masculinities), and at school (emerging protest masculinities). It became clear through the analysis that the different spaces of home, at school, and on-road afforded different masculinity performances.

Restricted access
Author: Jade Levell

This book shines a light on the lives of men who are simultaneously invisible as child survivors of domestic violence and abuse, but also rendered hyper-visible as young offenders on-road and gang-involved. The author explored in-depth life-stories focusing on the ways men, child survivors of domestic abuse and on-road/gang involvement, navigated their own sense of masculinity and manhood. Using the unique research method of music elicitation, participants were asked to bring three music tracks which helped them articulate their life stories. They discussed they ways in which they coped with childhood experiences of male violence, before engaging in all-male gangs. The author situates this within a wider context of gender-inequality and patriarchy. This analytic focus on masculinities draws on Connell’s concept of hegemonic masculinity and protest masculinity, which was supported by the application of intersectionality to focus on the impact of race, ethnicity, and class on gendered identity. The findings illustrated how the participants went through changing understandings of masculinities through the life-course. Co-existing harms such as sexual violence and sexual exploitation, school violence and exclusion, and peer-on-peer violence are discussed, with suggested implications for policy work and interventions. The author examines the connection between masculinity, vulnerability, and violence. They suggest that these are in a symbiotic relationship which is made visible through an understanding of protest masculinity. Ultimately this book brings forward a unique understanding of the gendered impact of gendered violence on boys and men.

Restricted access
Author: Jade Levell

In this chapter there is an exploration of the ways in which children who have experienced DVA have been historically overlooked and seen as on the periphery to the abuse. Boys who have experienced DVA have occupied a space of tension within feminist organizing around DVA. In the early days of the second-wave feminist movement boys were seen as peripheral to the woman-focused nature of the movement and its related interventions. The author highlights there is still much work to be done to open up the conversation about men’s childhood experiences of DVA. This chapter also focuses on the issues for boys identified as gang involved. Gang labelling has been reductionist, racialized, and classed.

The gaps in research and policy work in this area have led to an under-examination of the ways in which masculine identities are constructed by boys and young men who live with DVA.

Restricted access
Author: Jade Levell

This book shines a light on the lives of men who are simultaneously invisible as child survivors of domestic violence and abuse, but also rendered hyper-visible as young offenders on-road and gang-involved. The author explored in-depth life-stories focusing on the ways men, child survivors of domestic abuse and on-road/gang involvement, navigated their own sense of masculinity and manhood. Using the unique research method of music elicitation, participants were asked to bring three music tracks which helped them articulate their life stories. They discussed they ways in which they coped with childhood experiences of male violence, before engaging in all-male gangs. The author situates this within a wider context of gender-inequality and patriarchy. This analytic focus on masculinities draws on Connell’s concept of hegemonic masculinity and protest masculinity, which was supported by the application of intersectionality to focus on the impact of race, ethnicity, and class on gendered identity. The findings illustrated how the participants went through changing understandings of masculinities through the life-course. Co-existing harms such as sexual violence and sexual exploitation, school violence and exclusion, and peer-on-peer violence are discussed, with suggested implications for policy work and interventions. The author examines the connection between masculinity, vulnerability, and violence. They suggest that these are in a symbiotic relationship which is made visible through an understanding of protest masculinity. Ultimately this book brings forward a unique understanding of the gendered impact of gendered violence on boys and men.

Restricted access
Author: Jade Levell

In , the beginnings of the participants’ masculine biographies were outlined. They revealed the ways in which the participants inhabited a subordinate masculinity while living under the shadow of the DVA perpetrator in the private realm of home. Participants then sought opportunities outside the home where they were able to capitalize on how ‘hard’ and tough their home experiences had made them, added to the residual anger that they carried and looked for an outlet to express. Through these means they developed an emerging protest masculinity, propped up by the pursuit of opportunities for material gain, which started their journeys on-road.

Restricted access
Author: Jade Levell

This book shines a light on the lives of men who are simultaneously invisible as child survivors of domestic violence and abuse, but also rendered hyper-visible as young offenders on-road and gang-involved. The author explored in-depth life-stories focusing on the ways men, child survivors of domestic abuse and on-road/gang involvement, navigated their own sense of masculinity and manhood. Using the unique research method of music elicitation, participants were asked to bring three music tracks which helped them articulate their life stories. They discussed they ways in which they coped with childhood experiences of male violence, before engaging in all-male gangs. The author situates this within a wider context of gender-inequality and patriarchy. This analytic focus on masculinities draws on Connell’s concept of hegemonic masculinity and protest masculinity, which was supported by the application of intersectionality to focus on the impact of race, ethnicity, and class on gendered identity. The findings illustrated how the participants went through changing understandings of masculinities through the life-course. Co-existing harms such as sexual violence and sexual exploitation, school violence and exclusion, and peer-on-peer violence are discussed, with suggested implications for policy work and interventions. The author examines the connection between masculinity, vulnerability, and violence. They suggest that these are in a symbiotic relationship which is made visible through an understanding of protest masculinity. Ultimately this book brings forward a unique understanding of the gendered impact of gendered violence on boys and men.

Restricted access
Author: Jade Levell

In this chapter the author explores friendships and intimate relationships. Reflections on gang ties and the role of the gang as family are explored, as is the impact that bereavement had when peers were killed in gang-related serious youth violence. Narratives of relationships with participants’ mothers and wider family are explored. Attitudes to women as intimate partners were also discussed, with a focus on violence against women. Some participants disclosed that they had perpetrated abuse against female partners in the past. The theoretical frame of cathexis is used to examine the tensions of love and fear that laced the participants’ narratives.

Restricted access
Author: Jade Levell

In this chapter, the developments in the participants’ masculine biographies are discussed in relation to their adolescence. This was the period of their most significant engagement with on-road and gang-involved life. The participants’ narratives are analysed to identify the various ways in which they adopted a protest masculinity defined by marginalization and attempts to redress the powerlessness that they felt in younger childhood. There were two distinct ways the participants spoke about themselves with regard to masculinity as something culturally achieved. These were though the discourse of being or becoming ‘a man’ and being/becoming ‘The Man’. In this chapter the author explores in more depth the portrayal of both becoming ‘a man’ and ‘The Man’ and what this reveals about the types of masculinity, as well as those gendered behaviours that were most revered on-road.

Restricted access
Author: Jade Levell

In this chapter the author outlines the premise of the study and introduces the core theoretical concepts that underpin the rest of the book. This study uses gender theory to explore the participants’ narratives, resulting in an identification of different and at times competing masculinity performances affected by intersectional identities through the life course. The conceptualization of masculinity as a theoretical lens is explored, using Connell’s masculinity theory. The author situates masculinities within a wider understanding of patriarchy. Working definitions of on-road and gang involvement are outlined.

Restricted access