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Chapter 4 argues for a greater awareness and understanding of how macro-level developments, such as gentrification and transnational migration, influence the creation of AFCCs. It identifies two key challenges which limit the success and effectiveness of both age-friendly initiatives and the scholarly field of environmental gerontology: first, microfication, or the tendency to focus on immediate aspects of everyday life while overlooking broader, overarching aspects of the social context that define and set key parameters of daily experience; and second, erasure, referring to the issue that certain groups of people remain ‘unseen’ in policy, research, or institutional practices. Remedying the limiting effects of these tendencies will be essential to increase the value and effectiveness of both of these enterprises, the authors conclude.

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Chapter 5 examines the impact of gentrification processes in Berlin, Germany, on the distribution of older people across the city as well as the everyday experiences of ageing in socially disadvantaged neighbourhoods. The chapter concludes with an overview of developments in the context of political processes, where urban transformation driven by economic interests generates growing conflict and contradiction with the needs of an ageing and increasingly less affluent population.

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A Global Perspective

As the drive towards creating age-friendly cities grows, this important book provides a comprehensive survey of theories and policies aimed at improving the quality of life of older people living in urban areas.

In this book, part of the Ageing in a Global Context series, leading international researchers critically assess the problems and the potential of designing age-friendly environments. The book considers the different ways in which cities are responding to population ageing, the different strategies for developing age-friendly communities, and the extent to which older people themselves can be involved in the co-production of age-friendly policies and practices.

The book includes a manifesto for the age-friendly movement, focused around tackling social inequality and promoting community empowerment.

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Chapter 14 present a 10 point ‘Manifesto for Change’, drawing upon arguments and perspectives developed by the contributors to this book. Despite the expansion of the WHO Global Network of Age-Friendly Cities and Communities, the chapter argues, challenges remain in responding to the growth of inequality and the impact of economic austerity on policies targeted at older people. Given this context, it becomes especially important to develop a framework for action which strengthens commitment to the primary goal of making environments responsive to the diverse needs of people as they age. The aim of the manifesto is to sharpen debate in the age-friendly field as well as encourage new approaches amongst the various stakeholders, including urban planners, community developers, health and social care professionals, policy-makers, NGOs, voluntary workers, and not least, older people themselves.

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The book provides a comprehensive analysis of research and policies examining the development of age-friendly cities and communities. The chapters examine the theoretical assumptions behind the idea of an ‘age-friendly community’; provide case studies of age-friendly work in contrasting environments in Asia, Australia and Europe; and assess different design and policy interventions aimed at improving the physical and social environments in which people live. The book also has a ‘Manifesto for Change’, directed at the various stakeholders working in the field, containing a range of proposals aimed at raising ambitions for developing age-friendly activity.

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Chapter 13 tests the inclusivity of age-friendliness for the lives of older people with sight loss living within English urban and rural communities. The chapter presents findings from an in-depth study with diverse groups of older people with vision impairment to consider how their needs and aspirations can be, or are being met in relation to the development of age-friendly cities and communities. The study identifies transport and the built environment as two important areas for vision impaired older people, emphasising the significance of more inclusive design, including assistive technology and accessible street design, in facilitating social inclusion. In order to move AFCCs policies forward, the authors conclude, the approach requires recognition of the heterogeneity of the ageing population and the importance of involving people in co-design and co-production of living spaces.

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The book provides a comprehensive analysis of research and policies examining the development of age-friendly cities and communities. The chapters examine the theoretical assumptions behind the idea of an ‘age-friendly community’; provide case studies of age-friendly work in contrasting environments in Asia, Australia and Europe; and assess different design and policy interventions aimed at improving the physical and social environments in which people live. The book also has a ‘Manifesto for Change’, directed at the various stakeholders working in the field, containing a range of proposals aimed at raising ambitions for developing age-friendly activity.

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Chapter 11 identifies new and creative ways in which architects, artists and designers might be drawn into debates around age-friendly urban practice. The chapter describes the way in which current understandings of age-friendly design are limited and how an emerging field of socially engaged design practice can be harnessed to reinvigorate the terms of age-friendly debate and practice – drawing a new generation of designers into conversation with age-friendly policy. By redefining what we mean by age-friendly design, it becomes possible, this chapter argues, to expand and invigorate the field of age-friendly practice, enabling creative practitioners to engage with and creatively inform age-friendly policymaking.

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The book provides a comprehensive analysis of research and policies examining the development of age-friendly cities and communities. The chapters examine the theoretical assumptions behind the idea of an ‘age-friendly community’; provide case studies of age-friendly work in contrasting environments in Asia, Australia and Europe; and assess different design and policy interventions aimed at improving the physical and social environments in which people live. The book also has a ‘Manifesto for Change’, directed at the various stakeholders working in the field, containing a range of proposals aimed at raising ambitions for developing age-friendly activity.

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Chapter 8 examines the dynamics of the implementation process of an age-friendly county programme in one of the participating counties in Ireland, County Fingal. The chapter integrates the views of local, national and international stakeholders to explore the complex interplay of forces at these various levels that have influenced the development and impact of Fingal’s local programme. Findings from empirical research are used to explore the key stakeholders’ motivations and actions that were influential in developing and implementing the programme, and the attitudes, understandings and actions of these same stakeholders that underpin, and are reflected in, the processes established to involve older people in the programme. The chapter concludes by highlighting key issues that need to be addressed to enhance the potential impact of age-friendly community programmes on older adults’ lives.

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