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Drawing on qualitative interviews and focus groups with 35 community leaders, this article investigates how community leaders understand norms of care for older people in Zambia. I ask what leads older people in Zambia to receive good care from family. The findings show that across both rural and urban settings, respondents related profoundly powerful norms of reciprocity in both family and community care, with older people viewed as reaping what they have sown in terms of religious and economic contributions throughout their lives. The study raises challenging questions from a rights-based perspective as to who is deserving of care.

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In this study of older migrants living in informal settlements in Harare, we seek to understand what care and caring means for older people ageing far from their place of origin in conditions of informality in a country with no formal care infrastructure. We find that care relations derive from histories of migration, community, kinship, aspiration, displacement and disenfranchisement, with the provision of security within insecure systems core to the very idea of care. Further action is needed at all levels to foreground how older migrants are living on Zimbabwean society’s margins and to facilitate their daily practices of care.

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Compared with their peers, young carers are at a higher risk of being not in education, employment or training. Using Arksey and O’Malley’s framework, this review aims to map out the literature on young carers’ experiences of caring while attending school and their future career perceptions. The key themes that emerge from the literature include: the impact of the caring role on education and future aspirations; school awareness and multiagency support; and the positives gained from caring. Greater support in secondary school, along with multiagency collaboration, are highlighted as key influences on the likelihood of young carers maximising their career opportunities.

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The study explored how family care is developed and maintained in families in cases where more than one family member is involved in care. A total of 43 family carers in Austria participated in this qualitative study. Family care is a process of ongoing communication, in which responsibilities, coordination and conditions are negotiated among the family members involved. Three distinct care network types emerged from the data, which differ in terms of the individual perception of roles and responsibilities, and the distribution of care. Responsibilities for one another, awareness of being a family carer and the availability of resources are preconditions for the composition of these networks.

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The literature on later-life care is dominated by a focus on women as carers and older people as receivers, not providers, of care, as well as the analytical disembedding of care from wider social and economic processes. We examine the experiences of care and caring of former labour migrants who had migrated from Lesotho to work in South Africa’s mines in order to examine how these have changed over their lives. The latter demanded the tying of experience into wider social, economic and demographic processes. The research identified a methodological issue in the study of later-life care: survivor bias.

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In a fraught fiscal and post-pandemic context, English adult social care is likely to see further care home closures. To make sure that closures minimise distress and potentially negative outcomes for residents, this article reports findings from an analytical narrative review of the existing research evidence about the process and outcome of such closures in the UK. Despite the importance of these issues, there is little underpinning research to draw on when establishing good practice, with particular gaps in terms of understanding outcomes for older people, the experience of care staff, economic evidence and the perspectives of social care leaders.

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This study examines whether care workers in Finland feel able to provide adequate care for older people and analyses the working conditions that limit them from providing it. One third of the respondents felt that they were not able to provide sufficient care for older people. This was seen as being due to excessive workloads, a general lack of staff and accompanying physical and mental burdens. Improving care workers’ working conditions would enhance their work–life balance and allow them to help older people avoid situations of care poverty, that is, to receive the level of care they deserve.

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Indications of a care deficit for older adults in Africa and the need for long-term care that is acceptable for recipients and providers is well established, as are calls for its format to be ‘home-grown’. However, there is a discrepancy between the desire for evidenced African solutions, and the framing of both the problem and possible solutions derived from the Global North. This article draws on qualitative data from men and women needing and providing care in rural southern Malawi to challenge the implied universalism of the key terms of reference in the African long-term care discourse: ‘care’ and ‘family’.

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