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This article presents a new system for classifying UK charities’ activities according to their charitable purposes. It also outlines our attempts to use keyword search rules to apply these classifications to the various UK charity registers. The classification results and code, which are made freely available online, help to address the limitations of existing classification schemes in the UK context. Depending on the scheme, these include a lack of detail and coverage of important subsectors, a lack of systematic data collection and limits on the number of classifications per charity. We discuss the pros and cons of different approaches and show that the keyword searching method provides a sufficiently accurate and transparent approach. We also present some preliminary results on how commonly each ‘tag’ is matched against UK charities, as well as exploring how the results compare to existing classifications in the register of charities for England and Wales.

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Background:

Research partnership approaches that engage community members within the research team (for example, integrated knowledge translation, community-based participatory research) are typically used to enhance the relevance and usefulness of research findings. However, research outcomes generated through partnered research do not de facto address the priorities of those most affected nor take inclusion or power dynamics into consideration. Consensus methods (for example, Delphi, Deliberative Dialogue) can be used to develop evidence-based solutions by addressing the groups’ needs and priorities. Limited research has examined how consensus methods are used by research partnerships.

Aims and objectives:

Using the PRISMA-ScR checklist as a guide, this scoping review sought to better understand the use of consensus methods in research partnerships.

Methods:

The search strategy involved four databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EMBASE and CINAHL Plus). A total of 6,654 citations were screened, 404 were advanced for full text review, and 34 studies met eligibility criteria. Data from the 34 studies were extracted and iteratively analysed by three members of our research team.

Findings:

At least 11 different consensus methods were used with variations of the Delphi being most common. Issues of inclusion and power dynamics were rarely discussed. Overall, there was limited reporting of consensus methods, partnership approaches, and/or power dynamics.

Discussion and conclusions:

This review extends the literature by providing an overview of consensus methods that have been conducted in research partnerships and how they have been executed. We offer initial considerations for conducting and reporting on the use of consensus methods in research co-production.

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This article aims at contributing to the current literature on poverty data limitations and measurement by discussing the process for producing the first multidimensional poverty measure based on the consensual approach for the City of Buenos Aires. The results show a remarkable level of consensus about the necessities of life in the twenty-first century, underline the importance of generating more suitable indicators of deprivation and show that unmet basic needs-type variables are no longer adequate for measuring poverty in countries like Argentina. According to the valid and reliable poverty index, 20.3% of the city’s population live in households in multidimensionally poor households, this being the social dimension that shows the highest deprivation rate.

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How can young people’s activism help us to rethink community development? This collection explores the critical role that young people are playing in building a more hopeful and democratic future. The book has three aims: to show how a focus on ‘youth’ can contribute to sharpening understandings of community development; to foreground conceptualisations of radical democracy within the rethinking of community development; and to link developments within new youth social movements to the work of youth workers and community development practitioners and thus contribute to rethinking this relationship. The collection includes chapters on the eco movement, the struggles of refugees and the Black Lives Matter movement, and on changing understandings of sexual citizenship, highlighting, above all, emancipatory struggles and gestures of solidarity. Some chapters come from a European context, but they are made more complete and complex by the presence of writers and practitioners whose lives began in the Global South in countries such as India, Kenya and Brazil. The rich accounts counter the individualistic nature of capitalist society and reject the view that there is no alternative. In varying ways, authors present prefigurative practices of hope as an essential element of social movements for rethinking community development. Above all, the book calls for us to act in alliance with young people who are at the forefront of radical democratic practices of community development all over the world.

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Reflecting on the contributing chapters of the book, the chapter argues that prefigurative practices of hope are an essential element of social movements and community development. It positions hope as collective action, that has the capacity to emerge out of and in spite of other emotions, such as anger and fear in the face of climate catastrophe and the continued fallout from COVID-19. Drawing on the work of Ernst Bloch, the chapter theorises practices of imagination and action distinguishing educated hope from facile optimism. Drawing also on Braidotti and Derrida, it suggests that community development might open up new spaces ‘beyond binaries’ where exploration of friendship and the (im)possibility of common ground can flourish. The authors propose that hopeful radical democratic practice begins from certain refusals: of authoritarian populism and of neoliberal capitalist realism – in order to practise the inauguration of alternative, freer and more egalitarian forms. They argue that seeing young people as a forefront may require new ways of acting with and being in community.

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How can young people’s activism help us to rethink community development? This collection explores the critical role that young people are playing in building a more hopeful and democratic future. The book has three aims: to show how a focus on ‘youth’ can contribute to sharpening understandings of community development; to foreground conceptualisations of radical democracy within the rethinking of community development; and to link developments within new youth social movements to the work of youth workers and community development practitioners and thus contribute to rethinking this relationship. The collection includes chapters on the eco movement, the struggles of refugees and the Black Lives Matter movement, and on changing understandings of sexual citizenship, highlighting, above all, emancipatory struggles and gestures of solidarity. Some chapters come from a European context, but they are made more complete and complex by the presence of writers and practitioners whose lives began in the Global South in countries such as India, Kenya and Brazil. The rich accounts counter the individualistic nature of capitalist society and reject the view that there is no alternative. In varying ways, authors present prefigurative practices of hope as an essential element of social movements for rethinking community development. Above all, the book calls for us to act in alliance with young people who are at the forefront of radical democratic practices of community development all over the world.

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This chapter explores techniques for navigating and contesting the racialised legal geographies and policy frameworks that have disproportionately harmed multiple areas of life for people of African heritage within postcolonial Britain. The author draws on his own heritage, and gatherings with colleagues, friends, family and elders. The chapter begins at Elouise ‘Mama’ Edwards’ celebration of life in March 2021 – a towering figure within the African Caribbean diasporic community and beyond, who was committed to the community work of building support structures as foundation for freedom and balance. The writing of this chapter also cuts across and connects insights from organising with Windrush Defenders Legal C.I.C. and Channels Research Group; Q&As with civil servants; data analysis; libations; drumming; collaborative writing; counter archives; forums; judicial reviews and footnotes linking the multiple electronic languages of digital documentation. This poetic constellation of media and words maps the field through which memory survives – establishing lines of sight – towards scripting dreamt formulations of reparative futures.

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Food is often present in practices of community development and community building. Here, it has often been approached as part of the experience of poverty or as the basis for community cohesion work. This chapter unfolds a different perspective: it is concerned with the role of food in community-building activities that aim at systemic changes in the food system. It focuses on discursive, socio-material and sensory aspects of food in the building of a more sustainable local and alternative food community. Focusing on the work of a group of young environmental activists from Zurich, Switzerland, the chapter shows that eating together can spark positive dynamics that can be harnessed for community building and lead to more empowered relationships with food. It recognises how prescriptions about what and how to eat, how to handle and how to talk about food become markers of social distinction and possibly discrimination. For more inclusive practices to develop, the chapter identifies that addressing hurtful food experiences such as lack of food or eating disorders is necessary. Furthermore, the inclusion and competences of marginalised groups in the politicisation of food and in activities of community-based food production becomes essential.

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Author:

This chapter is based on empirical research conducted during 2017–19 in a social-housing and multiethnic neighbourhood, Sanitas, located in Tours, France. It focuses on a mobilisation against a renewal project in the neighbourhood and the relationships between different local structures including the Social Centre, Citizen Council and Sanitas Collective. The chapter argues that the top-down creation of participatory tools does not enable real empowerment of inhabitants leading to a local radical democracy but rather reflects the nature of neoliberal urban governance based on the efficiency of urban policies and the deconflictualisation of urban projects. It also discusses the tensions between different groups like young and ‘racialised’ people and activists in associations and the role the Social Centre plays in managing these tensions. Finally, the author highlights the importance of involving youth in the everyday life of the neighbourhood within the context of urban renewal.

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The lives of young people living in Brazilian urban peripheries are crossed by the overlaps between territorial stigma, racism, poverty, social insecurity, involvement in illicit activities, contact with criminal justice and diverse experiences of violence and violation of human rights. This chapter reflects on the territorialised and racialised distinctions of rights they experience. It explores the monsterisation and disposability of young people, analysing how structural racism is reproduced by both institutional practices and practitioner attitudes towards them. The chapter examines the possibilities and limits of cultural knowledge translations, diverse socio-historical realities and contrasting policy-practice environments in the context of working with young people between Brazil and the UK. In doing so, it opens up potential lines of dialogue with academics and practitioners by introducing some critical concepts and approaches for community development through the lenses of a pedagogy of convivência/coexistence. The chapter highlights relevant principles as reminders for practice, advocacy, policy impact and, more widely, political incidence, that is, the ability of social agents to influence the political processes and policy agendas.

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