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In this chapter, I profile feminist political economic geographer, Beverley Mullings. Dr Mullings’s research brings to economic geography a much-needed focus on global and intimate forms of neoliberal governmentality through an intersectional, multi-scalar analysis. Over her career, Dr Mullings has brought a sustained critique of the ways that development and state policies transform subjectivities, everyday lives and possibilities. Through a commitment to feminist political economy, she has been a leader in pushing the discipline to centre the multiple systems of oppression that shape people’s lives in space and place. Importantly, she has done this by focusing on the relationship between diaspora and home, spheres of social reproduction and the politics of praxis. In this profile, I shed light on how these three threads of her research work in concert and are each primary concerns for economic geography and geographers. Mullings’s research and her own praxis provide a more just model for doing economic geography research and academia.

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This chapter explores the resurgence of interest in social reproduction in the social sciences and its stalled uptake in economic geography. Charting a brief history of analyses of the relationship between productive and reproductive labour, I argue that feminist economic geographers have long called for a future research agenda for economic geography that takes seriously the domains of reproduction and care as ‘properly economic’. That reproductive labour is racialized, as well as gendered and classed, signals the imperative for feminists to take seriously the imbrication of social reproduction and racial capitalism in relation to both research and praxis.

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The subdiscipline of economic geography has a long and varied history, and recent work has pushed the field to diversify even further. This collection takes this agenda forward by showcasing inspiring, critical and plural perspectives for contemporary economic geographies. Highlighting the contributions of global scholars, the 30 chapters highlight fresh ways of approaching economic geography in research, teaching and praxis. With sections on thought leaders, contemporary critical debates and future research agendas, this collection calls for greater openness and inclusivity.

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Studies of consumption have long been positioned at the intersection of economic and cultural geography embracing the interplay between industry and commerce and the lifeworlds through which goods and services are purchased, used and experienced. Economic geographers have played an important role in mapping and conceptualizing the commodity chains linking consumers with local, regional and global systems of production, as well as understanding landscapes of retail and household economies. This chapter acknowledges a rich suite of consumption studies to which economic geography has contributed, but it also seeks to unsettle dominant narratives of consumption driven by Western framings. We suggest that perspectives of postcolonial economy help to foreground more inclusive and diverse geographies of consumption and theorization from Global South settings. To demonstrate this, we take food as our empirical focus and specifically examine changing discourses of food consumption in Brazil. We use a postcolonial lens to broaden the analysis of domestic food consumption in Brazil, revealing its plural contingencies and histories. In doing so, we place the values and models of food consumption in Brazil centre stage, with all its potential to inform critical and plural perspectives on contemporary economic geography.

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Inspiring, Critical and Plural Perspectives

The subdiscipline of economic geography has a long and varied history, and recent work has pushed the field to diversify even further. This collection takes this agenda forward by showcasing inspiring, critical and plural perspectives for contemporary economic geographies.

Highlighting the contributions of global scholars, the thirty chapters showcase fresh ways of approaching economic geography in research, teaching and praxis. With sections on thought leaders, contemporary critical debates and future research agendas, this collection calls for greater openness and inclusivity.

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Creativity in economic geography has primarily been addressed from two perspectives. One investigates spatial dynamics in cultural and creative industries and thus utilizes a rather sectoral approach to creative economies. The second is interested in processes of generating novel and valuable outcomes and thereby approaches creative practices. Both perspectives have already produced a heterogeneity and plurality of topics and themes in economic geography. Against this backdrop this chapter seeks to elaborate and appreciate the major strands of exchange within the discipline, focusing especially on creative work and creative processes. It seeks to depicture some of the main contributions stemming from economic geography to better understand the transformation processes in (primarily Western) contemporary economies driven by knowledge- and creativity-driven work. Furthermore, this chapter aims at particularly illuminating how critical perspectives in economic geography have helped us to better address, for example, new dimensions of inclusion or exclusion and new forms of vulnerabilities of certain groups within labour markets due to the transformation processes and the shifting attention of academic research. In light of the illuminated discourses this contribution concludes by tentative addressing potential consequences for future critical work in economic geography.

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The subdiscipline of economic geography has a long and varied history, and recent work has pushed the field to diversify even further. This collection takes this agenda forward by showcasing inspiring, critical and plural perspectives for contemporary economic geographies. Highlighting the contributions of global scholars, the 30 chapters highlight fresh ways of approaching economic geography in research, teaching and praxis. With sections on thought leaders, contemporary critical debates and future research agendas, this collection calls for greater openness and inclusivity.

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In this chapter, I argue that postcolonial theory will enable economic geographers to reinterpret and reimagine disaster recovery as a process that is not the sole responsibility of the state, and which cannot be gauged by statistically measuring the health of the economy. A postcolonial methodology offers a solid historicization of disaster contexts and how the need to adapt and be resilient among marginalized people across the world has its origins in their placation, exploitation and colonization. Postcolonial thinking can provide economic geographers with the methodology to unearth how anti-colonial and normative forms of societal and economic organization may rupture from disasters at the grassroots level. Therefore, adopting a postcolonial methodology in disaster contexts is not merely about trying to understand how a society recovers or moving beyond simple statistical measurements of the economy. It is also about exposing and thinking critically about alternative futures that take seek to address the structures that (re)produce the vulnerabilities that predicate disasters.

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This chapter explores Doreen Massey’s theorization of space as relationally constituted as a facet of her praxis-driven commitment to the liberatory potential of economic geography. The chapter outlines the genealogy and diverse application of Massey’s approach to relationality, through focusing on four areas of her scholarship: (1) her critique of industrial locations theory, (2) her work on gendered spatial divisions of labour, (3) her analysis of capitalist landownership and (4) her advancement of ‘power-geometries’ as a critique of globalization theories. I argue that these four dimensions demonstrate Massey’s overarching commitment to making the political and social relationality of space legible. In the second section of the chapter, I outline some of the ways Massey’s intellectual and political advancements infuse and strengthen feminist political economy’s application within economic geography, emphasizing, in particular, contemporary shifts towards a ‘praxis’-focused approach to economic ‘conjuncture’.

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In this chapter, I draw insights from Black feminist and postcolonial thinking to contribute to a growing engagement with the concept of intersectionality in the subfield of feminist political ecology. Employing the concept of postcolonial intersectionality, I reflect on how Black women in Latin America operationalize particular knowledges and their racialized gendered subjectivities to challenge regional imaginaries that limit livelihoods and access to natural resources. This chapter draws from ethnographic and historical data collection and is supplemented with news articles, activist scholarship, government documents and secondary resources. Together, I centre the intersectional logics of power in Bocas and argue that Afro-Panamanian women lead a material and symbolic process of place making, one that prioritizes life while struggling over carnal, gendered and racialized dispossession and the right to be recognized as human.

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