Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 879 items for :

  • Goal 3: Good Health and Well-being x
  • Equity, Diversity and Inclusion x
  • Social Work x
Clear All

The biennial conferences on Decisions, Assessment, Risk and Evidence in Social Work have reached a new milestone. Running in Belfast since 2010, the 2024 conference will be held in Zurich, Switzerland, 20–21 June. This article describes the journey to date and provides information for those interested in attending future conferences. This short article also includes some reflective comment on the contribution of the Decisions, Assessment, Risk and Evidence in Social Work conferences to learning and to the research community.

Restricted access

The Decisions, Assessment and Risk Special Interest Group of the European Social Work Research Association (DARSIG) dedicated a pre-conference event at the 2023 European Conference for Social Work Research in Milan, Italy, to the application of innovations using big data and machine-learning algorithms in social work risk assessment and decision-making processes. Here, we share some ideas from these discussions.

Full Access

This study set out to gain a better understanding of how family meetings are facilitated and experienced in an Irish rehabilitation hospital setting from the perspectives of interdisciplinary team (IDT) members, patients and their family members. This article reports the findings from IDT members’ perspectives. A critical-realist action-research approach was utilised that involved medical social workers (N = 15) and a social work academic. A quantitative, descriptive study design was adopted, which utilised a cross-sectional survey of IDT members. A total of 85 clinical staff responded to the questionnaire, of which 69 were fully completed. Four key themes emerged: pre-meeting engagement and preparation – a critical step; the impact of organisational structures; supporting participation; and mechanisms for effective family meetings. Findings indicate the importance of pre-meeting preparation, the mutuality of the relationships between participants, a standardised approach and the use of patient-centred and inclusive practices to achieve truly participatory family meetings. Family meetings involve complex processes in which mutual influence, context, preferences, values, information shared, the nature of the relationships involved and the communicative style of participants all play significant roles in both the process and decision-making outcomes. This study concluded that social workers are perhaps in a unique position to work with IDTs in clarifying the reality of the limits of choice and the involvement of the patient and family in rehabilitation hospital settings. In preparation for the role of family-meeting facilitation, the implementation of education and training programmes for IDT members is strongly recommended.

Full Access

This article examines the challenges encountered during a collaborative project involving research and practice in a Norwegian municipality. The objective of the project was to apply co-creation by involving users, employees and researchers in the development of coordinated, flexible and knowledge-based services, with a strong emphasis on user-centeredness. However, the project faced several obstacles that hindered its progress. In this article, we adopt a ‘what if’ perspective to explore alternative scenarios, identifying pivotal moments in the project and envisioning how alternative realities could have facilitated some of the fulfilment of its initial intentions. We argue that co-creation represents a mindset shift within the public sector, emphasising relational practices and embracing the inherent uncertainty associated with welfare service provision. By engaging in second-level inquiry, we propose that organisations can develop a co-creative logic that prioritises flexibility, innovation, involvement and ongoing evaluation, moving away from traditional reliance on routines, manuals and measurable outputs.

Restricted access

Measuring quality in communication is imperative for social work education, practice and research, but what does it take? This article describes the challenges faced by social workers in developing a set of scales and a coding framework for measuring quality in statutory social work communication between social workers and vulnerable young people. By sharing and reflecting on our experiences, we hope to offer other colleagues support in performing a similarly challenging task. A large body of filmed meetings from six different municipalities formed the basis for developing and testing the scales. All meetings between participants in the research process were taped, analysed and combined with field notes and coding results to identify the different challenges. The research process underlined not only that quality in statutory social work communication is a complex and context-dependent phenomenon but also that the process of quantifying and coding can generate new insights into the phenomenon. The analysis identifies that the quantitative translation of statutory social work communication created four different key challenges: ‘Struggling with context’; ‘When theory does not match reality’; ‘Unforgivable mistakes’; and ‘The relativistic no man’s land’.

Full Access

In this article, we discuss the challenges in engaging with research participants from marginalised communities, including from some minority communities where there are interconnecting issues of poverty, racism, school exclusion, family breakdown and sometimes youth crime. This is aligned with experiences of developing research partnerships with local services in evaluation work. Two research case studies, from evaluation research with child and family social work and the youth justice system, discuss experiences of researching within inner-city areas, navigating researcher–practitioner relationships and maintaining ethical research standards. In both cases, entering the research field presented challenges related to sensitivities and distress experienced by participants. Our case-study discussions demonstrate how the researchers responded to risk and unwitting involvement with young people in conflict, in prison and experiencing family bereavement. Highlighted is the vital importance of local agencies providing accurate information about the families and young people that the researchers are asked to contact in order to ensure that respect and research ethics are upheld and no trauma is caused. Planning and building trust are key to ensuring that time is given for respectful engagement and that agencies are ready for ongoing support and follow-up as needed. The article will explore how these methodological considerations can be taken forward.

Restricted access
Author:

Migration studies often focus on macro-level analyses, emphasising political and economic factors while overlooking personal (micro-level) aspects, whereas social work offers valuable insights into the individual experiences and needs of migrants. Little information exists regarding the perspectives of highly educated migrant women, including about the economic, social and emotional aspects of their migration experiences. This article focuses on how the professional identities of highly educated women in novel sociocultural settings are formed and examines how their professional identities influence their integration. Using snowball sampling, qualitative interviews were conducted with 36 participants from the Netherlands, Slovenia and Germany, supplemented by field notes and a demographic questionnaire. Looking through the micro-level contributes to a better understanding of the everyday lives of highly educated migrant women and the importance of maintaining their professional identities in a new environment in the context of social work and migration. By intersecting gender and education, this article addresses the complexities and the significance of professional identity among highly educated migrant women and its influence on their integration process, highlighting their challenges while also emphasising potential integration strategies and social policies for better social inclusion.

Restricted access