Research

 

You will find a complete range of our monographs, muti-authored and edited works including peer-reviewed, original scholarly research across the social sciences and aligned disciplines. We publish long and short form research and you can browse the complete Bristol University Press and Policy Press archive of over 1400 titles.

Policy Press also publishes policy reviews and polemic work which aim to challenge policy and practice in certain fields. These books have a practitioner in mind and are practical, accessible in style, as well as being academically sound and referenced.
 

Books: Research

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Knowledge, Practice and Neoliberal Reform in Community Mental Health Services
Author: Rich Moth

In this timely analysis, Rich Moth assesses mental health services in a period of major change.

Based on extended fieldwork in community mental health services, he explores the many impacts of policy reform, marketisation and austerity on NHS mental health provision, and positions developments in the contexts of neoliberalism and an increased emphasis on individual responsibility.

Firmly rooted in the lived experiences of people using mental health services, and the social workers, nurses and psychiatrists delivering them, this is a stimulating perspective on understandings of and responses to mental distress within this organisational setting.

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Delaying Institutionalization, Sustaining Families

What ‘kind’ of community is demanded by a problem like dementia?

As aspects of care continue to transition from institutional to community and home settings, this book considers the implications for people living with dementia and their carers.

Drawing on extensive fieldwork and case studies from Canada, this book analyses the intersections of formal dementia strategies and the experiences of families and others on the frontlines of care.

Considering the strains placed on care systems by the COVID-19 pandemic, this book looks afresh at what makes home-based care possible or impossible and how these considerations can help establish a deeper understanding necessary for good policy and practice.

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‘Hard to Reach’? Demystifying the Misconceptions
Author: Natalie Darko

In this crucial contribution to current debates, Natalie Darko exposes the misconception that health research and health services are equally effective for all and highlights their failures in engaging with Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) groups.

Drawing on case studies, this book presents essential examples of culturally tailored recruitment, engagement and partnerships with BME groups in research and public engagement. Drawing attention to the organisational, structural and cultural barriers that prevent access for BME groups, this important book exposes the practices within health research, clinical practice, commissioning and health services that perpetuate the stereotyping of BME groups as ‘hard to reach’.

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Volume 2: Co-production Methods and Working Together at a Distance

EPDF and EPUB available Open Access under CC-BY-NC-ND licence. Groups most severely affected by COVID-19 have tended to be those marginalised before the pandemic and are now being largely ignored in developing responses to it.

This two-volume set of Rapid Responses explores the urgent need to put co-production and participatory approaches at the heart of responses to the pandemic and demonstrates how policymakers, health and social care practitioners, patients, service users, carers and public contributors can make this happen.

The second volume focuses on methods and means of co-producing during a pandemic. It explores a variety of case studies from across the global North and South and addresses the practical considerations of co-producing knowledge both now - at a distance - and in the future when the pandemic is over.

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Volume 1: The Challenges and Necessity of Co-production

EPDF and EPUB available Open Access under CC-BY-NC-ND licence. Groups most severely affected by COVID-19 have tended to be those marginalised before the pandemic and are now largely being ignored in developing responses to it.

This two-volume set of Rapid Responses explores the urgent need to put co-production and participatory approaches at the heart of responses to the pandemic and demonstrates how policymakers, health and social care practitioners, patients, service users, carers and public contributors can make this happen.

The first volume investigates how, at the outset of the pandemic, the limits of existing structures severely undermined the potential of co-production. It also gives voice to a diversity of marginalised communities to illustrate how they have been affected and to demonstrate why co-produced responses are so important both now during this pandemic and in the future.

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