Research

 

You will find a complete range of our monographs, muti-authored and edited works including peer-reviewed, original scholarly research across the social sciences and aligned disciplines. We publish long and short form research and you can browse the complete Bristol University Press and Policy Press archive of over 1,500 titles.

Policy Press also publishes policy reviews and polemic work which aim to challenge policy and practice in certain fields. These books have a practitioner in mind and are practical, accessible in style, as well as being academically sound and referenced.
 

Books: Research

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23,385 items

Author:

This chapter identifies the potentially disruptive nature of the digitalization of workplaces in terms of our understanding of the ‘self’ at work. Traditional divides around work and private life, mind and body, machine and human are increasingly being reshaped by the introduction of certain kinds of technology into the labour market. It then proceeds to outline how these changes might be conceptualized on the traditional labour law narrative and the issues which arise from the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) into the workplace according to our inherited understanding of ‘personhood’; namely, the effect of AI on worker ‘rationality’ and ‘autonomy’. In this chapter, there is an investigation of the potential benefits and implications of changing our approach to ‘personhood’ in a theoretical sense. The final section explores how the alternative vision of personhood might be adopted, in practical terms, to increase the effectiveness of the regulation of AI in the workplace.

Restricted access
Evidence Challenges, Commercialization, and the Market for Hope

Available Open Access digitally under CC-BY-NC-ND licence.

This book delves into the complex and controversial realm of fertility care. It analyses the clash between evidence-based medicine and market dynamics in fertility treatments, with a unique focus on "add-on" treatments. It reveals how these contentious treatment options are now common practice and how they lead to an emerging market for hope.

With an interdisciplinary approach, this is an essential resource for readers in the fields of science and technology studies and medical sociology.

Open access
Author:

This chapter investigates how the COVID-19 pandemic has challenged our most basic assumptions about our ‘selves’ at work, and (hence) the relationship between labour law and social justice. On the one hand, the pandemic reemphasized worker corporeality and led to a greater incursion of health and safety concerns into the workplace. On the other hand, the COVID-19 pandemic served to accentuate the individualist and rationalist conception of the person at the heart of the law of the workplace. The chapter investigates the obstacles that this individualist/rationalist conceptualization of the person has caused in regulating the workplace both during and post-COVID. This approach has led to the erosion of collective and negotiated solutions, the equation of employee and employer struggles, and the inability of the law to protect those workers most in need. It is argued in the chapter that the analysis of labour law in the pandemic points to the need for a greater engagement with the moral project of embedding relationality at the heart of labour law, in order that labour law can better respond to labour market ‘shocks’.

Restricted access
Authors: and

In this chapter, the authors conclude with answers to a set of questions that can help people reflect on their philanthropy, and they outline the additional understanding that could be delivered by further research. They also provide a set of action steps, based on this research, that people who are contemplating their own philanthropic journeys can take.

Restricted access

The Conclusion underscores the significance of promoting responsible innovation within the field of fertility care. It raises concerns regarding the use of the concept of informed choice in context where evidence is lacking and information transparency is not guaranteed, discussing its impact on decision-making processes. Moreover, the chapter explores the regulatory challenges faced by the field and advocates for exploring various forms of corporate responsibility among stakeholders in biomedical innovation. Finally, it considers the broader implications of the growing commercialization of healthcare beyond the field of fertility care.

Open access
Author:

This chapter concludes on the possibility of generating a positive theory of social justice for labour law by changing the way in which ‘personhood’ is conceived. In the chapter it is argued that there are three main positive effects for labour law of adopting a more relational approach to personhood. This approach brings together the work of Marxist, feminist, and classical labour law scholars; it is an inclusive critical agenda. Second, addressing personhood at the heart of labour law is a way of reconciling some of labour law’s greatest contradictions and theoretical dilemmas. Third, the relationship between labour law and personhood is not just a theoretical issue; it is crucial to engage with personhood in order to move forward with a labour law agenda for social justice. The hope is that changing the way in which we view personhood as a matter of labour law will lead to law and policies which are more effective in improving the lives of workers. In particular, embedding relationality will make us more able to respond to labour market change.

Restricted access
Authors: and

In this chapter, the authors focus on a particular form of self, the essential or true self – that is, who philanthropists believe they truly are, were born to be or are meant to be. They first define what the essential self means, then explain how this essential self can be experienced, developed and expressed in the context of one’s philanthropy. They also explore how identity ceding can enhance these essential self-related processes and how the essential self is experienced in the five elements of self.

Restricted access

Chapter Two explores the complexities surrounding evidence in fertility care. It begins by examining the relationship between evidence-based medicine and fertility care, discussing the challenges of generating evidence in a highly commercialized sector. It highlights the premises for rapid innovation, based on the common understanding that the absence of evidence does not imply the evidence of absence of effectiveness. Furthermore, it discusses the delicate balance between the time needed to establish robust evidence and the urgency of providing care, further propelling innovation. In conclusion, the chapter explores patients’ perspectives on evidence, shedding light on their diverse views and concerns.

Open access

Chapter Three explores the intricate dynamics of the fertility market, analysing its multifaceted nature where medical assistance, innovation hype, and hope converge with significant ramifications. It offers a detailed examination of the marketing strategies employed in promoting biomedical innovation and contextualizes treatment decision-making within the framework of the hope market. Furthermore, it sheds light on the appeal of these treatments, rooted in their potential to support individuals in achieving their aspirations for parenthood, even in the absence of solid evidence. Finally, the chapter presents scholarly insights into the intricate process by which individuals navigate the complex landscape of informed choice amidst the compelling allure of hope.

Open access
Authors: and

In this chapter, the authors take the discussion of people’s sense of self to the next level and describe a particular self-transformation process that can provide a rich source of meaning for an individual’s philanthropy: identity ceding. Identity ceding is defined as a psychological process through which people willingly allow their sense of self to be transformed in order to achieve the goals they share with a community. Identity ceding can be experienced in five different elements of self: the agentic self; the object self; the experiential self; the represented self; and the meta-self. The authors define these terms and explain how they link together to provide a holistic sense of self. This chapter is by far the most conceptually challenging of all chapters in this book. It is also where the central thesis of the book begins to emerge. The authors describe the pivotal connection between what people do in their philanthropy, who they are as a person and how they relate to the community in which their philanthropy is grounded.

Restricted access