Research

 

You will find a complete range of our monographs, muti-authored and edited works including peer-reviewed, original scholarly research across the social sciences and aligned disciplines. We publish long and short form research and you can browse the complete Bristol University Press and Policy Press archive of over 1,500 titles.

Policy Press also publishes policy reviews and polemic work which aim to challenge policy and practice in certain fields. These books have a practitioner in mind and are practical, accessible in style, as well as being academically sound and referenced.
 

Books: Research

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This chapter provides an overview of the origins and complexities of Salvation Army retail operations in the period before the First World War. Criticisms at the time and since identified a captive workforce and market, arguing retailing was a distraction from its spiritual aims. In response, the scope of retail operations evolved while the Salvation Army used its own publications to articulate, justify and advertise the production and consumption of Salvationist-made goods as a material embodiment of belonging to the social and spiritual community.

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This chapter develops a study of the municipality of Chalatenango. The type of local order in Chalatenango is defined as society-led, that is, an order shaped by an ecology of governance in which societal actors play a crucial role as public goods providers and violence regulators. The analysis shows that community organization and translocal dynamics are crucial to explaining violence containment. Local communities have managed to control the levels of lethal violence and deter criminal actors amid a national context characterized by state neglect and chronic violence. Community organization is not territorially bound but extends across transnational networks. Migrants are a source of livelihoods for the local population; they also contribute to providing public goods and participate in local forms of organization. Transnational networks have forged a migration corridor that enables immigration to the United States. In doing this, outmigration has worked as a safety valve that relieves social tensions and reduces grievances. Additionally, community organization informally contributes to the capacity of the local state to perform its functions, thereby shaping cooperative state–society relations.

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This chapter charts the development of today’s familiar model of the British charity shop. It shifts our attention away from the elusive charitable consumer and onto the charities and their local branches as fundraising retailers. The beginnings of the fair trade movement, the creation of trading companies and the hiring of professional trading directors were all less important to the charity shop’s early phases of mass expansion than older philanthropic and volunteering traditions which informed the associational culture of second-hand selling in local communities.

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This chapter presents a transcultural analysis of the commodification of Japanese culture at a charity bazaar in the late-Victorian North East of England. Despite the local area’s steel industry connections with modern Japan, the organizers of the Mikado Festival opted for an idealized fairyland misrepresentation of a pre-industrial Old Japan village in order to create a respectable environment for a Church fundraising event. The bazaar and the Japanese Shop opened two years later were both transcultural contact zones where imperialistic and cosmopolitan narratives co-existed.

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This chapter recapitulates the main elements of the analytical approach, key findings and the integral aspects of the empirical analysis. It discusses the findings and examines the trajectories of governance of the set of four cities from a cross-case perspective, taking the scope of the multifaceted transitions induced by the third wave of democratization in Latin America as a point of reference. Last, the chapter elaborates on empirical policy implications, emphasizing the need to develop a more comprehensive approach to address urban violence in Latin America, including a much-improved understanding of the conditions and processes enabling the entrenchment of criminal groups in local communities and nurturing illegal economies, on the one hand, and ensuring the endurance of state violence, on the other. Such a perspective entails the recognition of the diversity of cities in the region. In this regard, the chapter foregrounds the characteristics of peripheral cities and their implications for a richer understanding of the dynamics of urban violence and peace.

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This chapter explores the operational difficulties Cecil Jackson-Cole faced when attempting to export his successful British model of Oxfam and Help the Aged shops to South Africa in the 1970s. It considers both the underestimated differences in cultures of gift-giving, volunteering and second-hand retailing, as well as controversies over leadership and management stemming from a reluctance to relinquish overall control. British charity retail – like its relief programming counterparts – is seen to have maintained distinctive neo-colonial characteristics long into the 20th century.

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This chapter unpacks the interconnected narratives, mythologies and empirical realities of what is known as the Asian corner shop. It adopts a race-critical sociological approach to understanding the postcolonial encounter at the counter since the 1970s, facilitating more complex and nuanced discussions of the social embeddedness of retail in Britain as a connection to wider global histories. Both the shop and the shopkeeper, as a familiar stranger, were and remain always in production, as an interplay of migration histories, societal changes and contemporary cultural community processes.

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This chapter uses two case studies to explore community support from retailers during protracted industrial disputes: the 1984/1985 British Miners’ Strike and the 1951 New Zealand Waterfront Lockout. Across separate but connected societies, the consistency of retailer support in working-class communities demonstrates the socially embedded nature of their business. Credit, donations and access to business premises all demonstrate the interrelated social and economic relationships between retailers and their communities, and the moral understanding that framed those relationships.

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This chapter uses the case study of a late-Victorian tailor to explore the giving of credit and the payment of debts from both economic and social perspectives. Trust, rooted in social relationships, was central to credit relations as the firm responded to a rising level of unrecoverable debt and an increase in the time taken to make repayments. Personal connections between the male and middle-class clientele and partners ensured a high degree of customer loyalty that was crucial to the survival of the business.

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This introduction explains the rationale of the book and presents an overview of the key concepts and arguments informing the empirical analysis. It discusses the relevance of approaching violence in peripheral cities through an order-centred perspective. Likewise, the chapter introduces the tenets of the research design and empirical approach. Particularly, the constitutive elements of the ‘comparative case-study approach’ (CSS) and the impact of ethics, positionality and reflexivity in the research process and analysis. The chapter also positions the book’s analytical and empirical contributions in relation to the existing scholarship and debate on urban violence in Latin America. The chapter concludes with a description of the book’s structure and chapters.

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