Series: Global Migration and Social Change

 

Series Editors: Nando Sigona, Institute for Research into Superdiversity, University of Birmingham, UK and Alan Gamlen, Monash University, Australia

This monograph series showcases original research that looks at the nexus between migration, citizenship and social change. This series aims to open up interdisciplinary terrain and to develop new scholarship in migration and refugee studies that is theoretically insightful and innovative, empirically rich and policy engaged.

Global Migration and Social Change

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Relocations, Relationships and Resources
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Leading migration researcher Louise Ryan’s topical and intersectional book provides rich insights into migrants’ social networks.

It draws on more than 200 interviews with migrants who followed various transnational routes in every decade since the 1940s, in order to build valuable longitudinal perspectives and comparisons. With a particular focus on London, it charts how social networks are formed and sustained, how trust is developed and how social support is accessed, and explores the key opportunities and obstacles that migrants encounter.

This is a seminal fusion of migration studies and social network analysis that casts new light on both subjects, essential for those interested in immigration, ethnicity, diversity and inequalities.

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Reclaiming Affect for Agency

This book unpacks how emotions and affect are key conceptual lenses for understanding contemporary processes and discourses around migration.

Drawing on empirical research, grassroots projects with migrants and refugees, and mediated stories of migration and asylum seeking from the Global North, the book sheds light on the affects of empathy, aspiration and belonging to reveal how they can be harnessed as public emotions of positive collective change.

In the face of increasing precariousness, Khorana calls for uncovering the potential of these affects in order to build new forms of care and solidarities across differences, and in the wake of intersecting global crises.

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Critical Activist Research across Ecuadorean Borders

Drawing from an activist research project spanning Loja, Santo Domingo, New York, New Jersey, and Barcelona, this book offers a feminist intersectional analysis of the impact of migration on health and well-being.

It assesses how social inequalities and migration and health policies, in Ecuador and destination countries, shape the experiences of migrants. The author also explores how individual and collective action challenges health, geopolitical, gender, sexual, ethnoracial, and economic disparities, and empowers communities.

This is a thorough analysis of interpersonal, institutional, and structural mechanisms of marginalization and resistance. It will inform policy and research for better responses to migration’s negative effects on health, and progress towards greater equality and social justice.

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Male Migrants, Interrupted Journeys and Precarious Lives
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EPDF and EPUB available Open Access under CC-BY-NC-ND

Amid the heavy politicisation and problematisation of male migrants in Europe, this ethnographic study casts new light on their experiences, struggles and everyday resistance.

The author follows the journeys of those who seek, but have little hope of achieving, permanent residence status in European countries, tracking their successive migrations, detentions and deportations within and beyond the continent. She explores migrants’ tactics, the impact of precarity on their lives and the dual feelings of enduring hope and powerless vulnerability they experience.

This is a sensitive and insightful analysis of how the European migration regime shapes, and is shaped by, migrants’ practices.

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Mobility, Control, Agency

This powerful book explicates the many ways in which colonial encounters continue to shape forced migration, ever evolving with times and various geographical contexts.

Bringing historians, political scientists, sociologists, anthropologists, and criminologists together, the book presents examples of forced migration events and politics ranging from the 18th century to the practices and geopolitics in the present day. These case studies across Europe, Africa, North America, Asia and South America are then put in dialogue with each other to propose new theoretical and real-world agendas for the field.

As the pervasive legacies of colonialism continue to shape global politics, this unprecedented book moves beyond critique, ahistoricity and Eurocentrism in refugee and forced migration studies and establishes postcoloniality and forced migration as an important field of migration research.

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Care and Cruelty in Australia’s Asylum Seeker Prisons

Michelle Peterie’s revealing research offers a fresh angle on the human costs of immigration detention.

Drawing on over 70 interviews with regular visitors to Australia’s onshore immigration detention facilities, Peterie paints a unique and vivid picture of these carceral spaces. The book contrasts the care and friendship exchanged between detainees and visitors with the isolation and despair that is generated and weaponised through institutional life. It shows how visitors become targets of institutional control, and theorises the harm detention imposes beyond the detainee.

As the first research in this area, this book bears important witness to Australia’s onshore immigration detention system, and offers internationally relevant insights on immigration, deterrence and the politics of solidarity.

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Contemporary Asia–Australia Migration and Everyday Time

Shanthi Robertson provides fresh perspectives on 21st-century migratory experiences in this innovative study of young Asian migrants’ lives in Australia.

Exploring the aspirations and realities of transnational mobility, the book shows how migration has reshaped lived experiences of time for middle-class young people moving between Asia and the West for work, study and lifestyle opportunities. Through a new conceptual framework of ‘chronomobilities,’ which looks at 'time-regimes' and 'time-logics', Robertson demonstrates how migratory pathways have become far more complex than leaving one country for another, and can profoundly affect the temporalities of everyday life, from career pathways to intimate relationships.

Drawing on extensive ethnographic material, Robertson deepens our understanding of the multifaceted relationship between migration and time.

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International Policy and Discourse

Assessing migration in the context of climate change, Nash draws on empirical research to offer a unique analysis of policy-making in the field. This detailed account is a vital step in understanding the links between global discourses on human mobilities, climate change and specific policy responses. An important contribution to several ongoing debates in academia and beyond.

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Solidarity and Migrant Activism in Japan
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This is the first book to investigate how migrants and migrant rights activists work together to generate new forms of citizenship identities through the use of language. Shindo’s book is an original take on citizenship and community from the perspective of translation, and an alluring amalgamation of theory and detailed empirical analysis based on ethnographic case studies of Japan.

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Producing Workers and Immigrants
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This book responds to global tendencies toward increasingly restrictive border controls and populist movements targeting migrants for violence and exclusion. Informed by Marxist theory, it challenges standard narratives about immigration and problematises commonplace distinctions between ‘migrants’ and ‘workers’. Using Britain as a case study, the book examines how these categories have been constructed and mobilised within representations of a ‘migrant crisis’ and a ‘welfare crisis’ to facilitate capitalist exploitation. It uses ideas from grassroots activism to propose alternative understandings of the relationship between borders, migration and class that provide a basis for solidarity.

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