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Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) are now one of the central features of government policy in the UK for managing the risk presented by violent and sexual offenders. Although there has been research and debate concerning the use of MAPPA with adult offenders, their application to young people has received relatively little attention until now.

Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements & Youth Justice extends the existing literature on public protection. It provides a detailed exploration of MAPPA policy and practice in order to prompt further debate about the implications of the risk paradigm for young people and youth justice practitioners.

In the book, key academics, practitioners and policy makers consider a range of theoretical and practical issues raised by the introduction of MAPPA including risk and children’s rights, the use of professional discretion by practitioners, alternative approaches to risk management and suggestions for future policy development. It will be of interest to both professionals and academics working with young offenders and in youth justice.

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This chapter focuses on why there may be practical difficulties for Youth Offending Teams (YOTs) and those running Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) to work alongside one another. The first part of the chapter outlines the Oxford MAPPA study, summarising the main findings and discussing some of its limitations. The chapter then presents a brief history of YOTs and MAPPA, drawn from available research and guidance. It considers recommendations from the Oxford MAPPA study, with an emphasis on why these were made and what they hoped to accomplish, alongside a realisation that more thought needs to be given to issues beyond simply the process and administration of risk management in this context. The conclusion underlines the need for YOTs to be involved with MAPPA, on the basis that their absence means a body of knowledge about young people will be missing from the process. The chapter also considers legislation and risk context as factors in decision making.

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This chapter brings together the central themes of the book and raises a number of questions about the ways in which young people are treated by criminal justice agencies, and whether Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) as currently conceptualised are an appropriate system for effectively working with young people who have committed serious offences. It also highlights areas where further information is required and demonstrates that the study of MAPPA is a fertile ground for furthering debates around risk and rights. Finally, it argues that lessons can be learnt from the implementation of MAPPA in Scotland and Northern Ireland, which can usefully inform the ongoing development of youth justice policy in England and Wales.

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‘Public protection’ is an umbrella term that refers to a range of activities by local authorities and other government agencies in the United Kingdom. Within the context of this book, however, the phrase relates solely to serious offending (that is, violent and sexual offences). A long-running topic within the criminal justice literature has been what the state’s response should be to those individuals who threaten serious harm to others. Current debates in criminology focus on security and the governance of criminal justice. Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA), as their name suggests, are a part of this debate. This book explores MAPPA policy and practice in the UK, focusing on the current state of community risk management in England and Wales, highlighting previous research in this area, and setting out future directions for investigation. It also widens this debate with contributions that introduce ideas about risk management from Scotland, examines the form and function of discretion in the current system and reframes the debate on MAPPA and young people in terms of rights and risks.

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Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPAs) are now one of the central features of government policy in the United Kingdom for managing the risk presented by violent and sexual offenders. Although there has been research and debate concerning the use of MAPPAs with adult offenders, their application to young people has received relatively little attention until now. This book extends the existing literature on public protection. It provides a detailed exploration of MAPPA policy and practice in order to prompt further debate about the implications of the risk paradigm for young people and youth justice practitioners. In the book, key academics, practitioners and policy makers consider a range of theoretical and practical issues raised by the introduction of MAPPA including risk and children’s rights, the use of professional discretion by practitioners, alternative approaches to risk management, and suggestions for future policy development.

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Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPAs) are now one of the central features of government policy in the United Kingdom for managing the risk presented by violent and sexual offenders. Although there has been research and debate concerning the use of MAPPAs with adult offenders, their application to young people has received relatively little attention until now. This book extends the existing literature on public protection. It provides a detailed exploration of MAPPA policy and practice in order to prompt further debate about the implications of the risk paradigm for young people and youth justice practitioners. In the book, key academics, practitioners and policy makers consider a range of theoretical and practical issues raised by the introduction of MAPPA including risk and children’s rights, the use of professional discretion by practitioners, alternative approaches to risk management, and suggestions for future policy development.

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