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  • Author or Editor: Sheila Peace x
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Innovative approaches

The housing problems of older people in our society are highly topical because of the growing number of retired people in the population and, especially, the yet-to-come increasing number of ‘very old’ people. Government policies on the care of older people have been forthcoming from Whitehall, but the issue of housing is just beginning to be seriously addressed.

This book represents a first attempt at bringing together people from the worlds of architecture, social science and housing studies to look at the future of living environments for an ageing society. Projecting thinking into the future, it asks critical questions and attempts to provide some of the answers. It uniquely moves beyond the issues of accommodation and care to look at the wider picture of how housing can reflect the social inclusion of people as they age.

Inclusive housing in an ageing society will appeal to a wide audience - housing, health and social care workers including: housing officers, architects, planners and designers, community regeneration workers, care managers, social workers and social care assistants, registered managers and housing providers, health improvement staff and, of course, current and future generations of older people.

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The housing problems of older people in one’s society are highly topical because of the growing number of retired people in the population and, especially, the yet-to-come increasing number of ‘very old’ people. Government policies on the care of older people have been forthcoming from Whitehall, but the issue of housing is just beginning to be seriously addressed. This book represents a first attempt at bringing together people from the worlds of architecture, social science, and housing studies to look at the future of living environments for an ageing society. Projecting thinking into the future, it asks critical questions and attempts to provide some of the answers. It uniquely moves beyond the issues of accommodation and care to look at the wider picture of how housing can reflect the social inclusion of people as they age.

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The housing problems of older people in one’s society are highly topical because of the growing number of retired people in the population and, especially, the yet-to-come increasing number of ‘very old’ people. Government policies on the care of older people have been forthcoming from Whitehall, but the issue of housing is just beginning to be seriously addressed. This book represents a first attempt at bringing together people from the worlds of architecture, social science, and housing studies to look at the future of living environments for an ageing society. Projecting thinking into the future, it asks critical questions and attempts to provide some of the answers. It uniquely moves beyond the issues of accommodation and care to look at the wider picture of how housing can reflect the social inclusion of people as they age.

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To date, one’s thinking around ‘accommodation and care’ in later life focuses on very old people who are seen as unable to fit into mainstream housing and whose needs have been labelled as special, segregated, or separate, rather than accepting accommodation and care as part of society’s needs in general. However, at present, it is undeniable that people are becoming a part of an ageing population whose structure is changing and where there will be a great diversity of household types. This chapter explores the changing population, the type of society that is developing, how this is affecting where people live, and the experiences that many older people now face. It includes a brief discussion on population projections, geographical variations, and the changing nature of households and the social, psychological, and physiological issues relating to it.

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Inclusive housing allows individuals to take part fully in their preferred mode of life. This chapter discusses the concept of inclusive housing: what it means, what it implies, and what it demands. With a vision of the future where desirable design features in general housing include planned accessibility and sustainability, this chapter examines inclusive housing and its application to housing the ageing society as well as the issues relating to the aspects of material and social environments, resources, technologies, and issues around choice and self-determination.

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This chapter discusses three types of housing provision that represent different stages in the evolution of policy on housing the general population and those defined as ‘vulnerable’ — high-rise housing, sheltered housing, and care housing for people with dementia. It highlights developments and issues for these three types of housing and care environments and examines whether and how age-segregated environments affect older people’s interactions within and beyond their immediate accommodation. In addition, the three studies provide differing views of how accommodation and support may be offered in the future and raise questions regarding the interface between people and places and what it tells about technological and social management systems.

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