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  • Author or Editor: Úna Barr x
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Criminology’s focus on desistance theory is illustrative of its phallocentric occupation. This chapter considers the implications of this wilful acceptance in criminal justice policy and practice on the experiences of criminalized women while considering an alternative anti-carceral, intersectional feminist way forward. First, the drive of desistance praxis which has perpetually encouraged criminalized women to (re)enter and engage with ‘conventional society’ and develop and maintain social bonds that will support desistance trajectories is critiqued. It is argued that ‘re/integration’ is often not possible, nor desired. Second, it is contended that a concentration on agentic, individualized desistance, as well as uncritical promotion of relational desistance, has resulted in state support for responsiblized criminalized individuals making changes to their own lives, in the absence of robust structural support mechanisms. Finally, it is outlined how the bulk of desistance literature has not critiqued the role of the prison, nor the wider aspects of the criminal justice system in creating social harm, beyond contributing to, or standing as a barrier to, desistance from crime. The chapter is concluded by putting forward a vision for anti-carceral, intersectional feminist desistance research, theory, policy and practice.

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Politics, Intervention, Resistance

From the denial of abortion rights in Ireland to sexual violence against British South Asian women in England, the state and its institutions continue to fail women. This book offers a counter narrative to contemporary injustices and a persistent culture of victim-blaming.

The academic and activist contributions to this collection explore contemporary research areas and pursue new discursive directions in order to present a feminist criminology, built on feminist praxis, for the twenty-first century.

Providing a direct challenge to regressive and ineffective theory, policy and practice, this book resists the politics of gendered victimisation through extending feminist analyses of the state and documenting interventions into contemporary injustices.

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1: Introduction: Denying Oppression a Future 1 – Gender, the State and Feminist Praxis
Authors: , , and

The introduction to the collection begins by outlining the aims of the book – broadly, to document a series of feminist interventions into criminology; to discuss injustice as a feminist issue; and to promote responses built on feminist praxis. It examines where we are currently in relation to issues outlined forty years ago by seminal feminist texts including Dobash and Dobash’s Violence Against Wives: A Case against the Patriarchy (1979). To do this, the chapter addresses what can be achieved through feminist praxis and traces significant theoretical and methodological developments. Next, the chapter considers a number of persistent issues with the process of gendered victimization through an exploration of prevailing cultural norms, contemporary regimes of truth and the enduring role of the state. Finally, the chapter attempts to map the ground for resistance and consider the (necessarily limited) harms towards women and girls which the collection discusses, and the vision of justice articulated, indeed demanded, by the contributors.

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From the denial of abortion rights in Ireland to sexual violence against British South Asian women in England, the state and its institutions continue to fail women. This book offers a counter-narrative to contemporary injustices and a persistent culture of victim-blaming. The academic and activist contributions to this collection explore contemporary research areas and pursue new discursive directions in order to present a feminist criminology, built on feminist praxis, for the 21st century. Providing a direct challenge to regressive and ineffective theory, policy and practice, this book resists the politics of gendered victimization through extending feminist analyses of the state and documenting feminist interventions into contemporary injustices.

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From the denial of abortion rights in Ireland to sexual violence against British South Asian women in England, the state and its institutions continue to fail women. This book offers a counter-narrative to contemporary injustices and a persistent culture of victim-blaming. The academic and activist contributions to this collection explore contemporary research areas and pursue new discursive directions in order to present a feminist criminology, built on feminist praxis, for the 21st century. Providing a direct challenge to regressive and ineffective theory, policy and practice, this book resists the politics of gendered victimization through extending feminist analyses of the state and documenting feminist interventions into contemporary injustices.

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From the denial of abortion rights in Ireland to sexual violence against British South Asian women in England, the state and its institutions continue to fail women. This book offers a counter-narrative to contemporary injustices and a persistent culture of victim-blaming. The academic and activist contributions to this collection explore contemporary research areas and pursue new discursive directions in order to present a feminist criminology, built on feminist praxis, for the 21st century. Providing a direct challenge to regressive and ineffective theory, policy and practice, this book resists the politics of gendered victimization through extending feminist analyses of the state and documenting feminist interventions into contemporary injustices.

Restricted access