Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: Aimee Ambrose x
Clear All Modify Search
Transitions Built on Justice

This collection pays unique attention to the highly challenging problems of addressing inequality within decarbonisation – particularly under-explored aspects, such as high consumption, degrowth approaches and perverse outcomes.

Contributors point out means and possibilities of the transition from high carbon inequalities to post-carbon inclusion. They apply a variety of conceptual and methodological approaches in all-inclusive ways to diverse challenges, such as urban heating and retrofitting.

Richly illustrated with case studies from the city to the household, this book critically examines ‘just transitions’ to achieve sustainable societies in the future.

Restricted access

Transitions to low carbon domestic heating systems need to speed up. However, the speed of the transition must not compromise inclusivity and opportunities to redress injustices inherent in the current system. This chapter forwards two core arguments: first, it argues that, although mundane, changes to the way we heat our homes are also personal and can be life-altering. If the transition to low carbon heating is to avoid disadvantaging anyone then care must be taken to understand how different groups within society, and even different individuals within a household, are differentially affected by changes to home heating. Second, drawing on an Anglo-Swedish study, we argue that we have transitioned from one approach to home heating to another before, offering opportunities to learn from experiences of past heating transitions to inform a fairer and more inclusive transition this time around. Learning from past heating transitions requires the introduction of historical methods to the field of energy studies and we consider the merits of oral histories in this context. Important considerations are prompted by the deep, personal accounts of transition shared by respondents, raising important considerations for those driving the transition, helping to bridge policy discourse and life worlds.

Restricted access

The moral discourse around low carbon transitions currently favours justice as its main virtue (often expressed through the concept of just transition), often highlighting injustice within the current system. When we aim for justice, our focus is on what is lacking rather than what is possible. Low carbon transitions are an opportunity to reinvent our systems and ways of life but also the associated virtues that guide them. The transition must exclude no one and must prioritize those most in need and most disadvantaged by the current system. In this context, the concept of justice (transitioning away from fossil fuels in a way which promotes a fairer world) is a useful guide. But is justice all we should be aiming for? This chapter experiments with positioning alternative virtues as guiding principles for low carbon transitions and reflects on the implications for inclusion and the promotion of thriving through transition. Ultimately, we put forward an alternative framework, which does not ignore justice but promotes the virtues of generosity and care as foundations of justice or complements to it. In concert, these virtues have the potential to shape transitions from the starting point of genuine concern for the wellbeing of others.

Restricted access

Inclusion is so central to the response to climate change that any response that does not place inclusion at the centre imperils the whole project and, therefore, the future of humanity. Current proposed solutions to mitigate climate change are exacerbating inequality, and feeding both misery and resistance to climate mitigation as a societal goal. While markets create the poverty and the social boundaries that imperil decarbonization, national governments protect national interests against planetary interests, inter-generational interests and inter-species interests. Post-carbon inclusion is, thus, not simply a ‘nice-to-have’ combination, rather it is a necessary agenda that supersedes decarbonization via business-as-usual processes.

The implications for post-carbon inclusion research and practice are grouped here into three entangled and overlapping elements: mapping the terrain through deeper understandings of society and practice; resetting rights and justice; and empowerment and agency. The resultant agenda provides directions for research and policy communities working in partnership in the growing field of post-carbon inclusion studies. As pointed out by movements of environmental justice, degrowth and social justice, hope lies in new forms of engagement, in new agents and actors operating in new ways.

Restricted access

As efforts to address the climate crisis (hopefully) continue to multiply across the urban world, two central questions are brought to the fore: first, how could these efforts be made effective and sufficient to address the climate emergency and heal the planet for future generations? Second, to what extent can effective actions also promote justice and inclusion? To address these questions, this chapter sets out four starting premises and introduces key concepts of post-carbon inclusion, set against current initiatives on ecological modernization, circular economies, just transitions, socio-technical transitions and degrowth. Decarbonization and inequality are entangled at multiple scales, whether planetary, national, regional, city, local community or house(hold). The implications and ramifications of such socio-technological entanglement matter insofar as they might reinforce each other; they might present as a Faustian bargain. For example, is the rush for minerals to feed low carbon technology unacceptably exacerbating global ecosystem decline? This chapter describes how efforts to decarbonize necessarily disrupt and reconfigure domestic and urban scale infrastructures and practices, generating new patterns of difference and marginality, as illustrated in the various chapters throughout the book.

Restricted access

This chapter recognizes that debates around how to secure an inclusive post-carbon society must pay close attention to those who excessively consume. Our work here is premised on the notion that more equitable resource distribution relies on some groups consuming less to enable others to increase their consumption to safe and healthy levels. It explores why high and escalating consumption is problematic in the context of the climate crisis and discusses how high consumers might be most usefully conceptualized and defined. Furthermore, in attempting to advance a research agenda focused on high consumers, we reflect on the challenges of conducting research which runs contra to dominant economic paradigms (such as perpetual economic growth) and social conventions. We draw on a literature review and insights from stakeholder interviews with academics and practitioners which highlight the need for a greater focus on high consuming households and reveal the conceptual and ethical dilemmas this presents. We go on to discuss how research with this elusive group (high consumers) might best be approached and explore the potential of a novel application of institutional ethnography to explicate the ‘work’ of being wealthy.

Restricted access