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  • Author or Editor: Alison Bartlett x
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This chapter is grounded in the idea that more visual imagery of breastfeeding will contribute to its normalisation, and counter the commercial sexualisation of breasts. It suggests, however, that this strategy is not just about seeing but also about feeling. To demonstrate this the chapter turns to a controversial piece of public art — Patricia Piccinini’s Skywhale — which was launched in Australia in 2013 and has been touring internationally. The Skywhale is a hot-air balloon in the shape of a fantastical creature of the imagination, which features five giant breasts on each side. This unexpected flying mammal provokes responses wherever it goes, and arguably provides productive ways of engaging public responses to breastfeeding and maternity. This chapter examines responses to Skywhale through broadsheet and social media, and then analyses its affective domain through psychoanalytic concepts and its materiality through the tradition of public art and monuments. The extremes of intimacy and monumentality configured through Skywhale offer an object par excellence for seeing breastfeeding writ large in the public domain, and for feeling the return of the maternal. The chapter argues that this is fundamental to a shift in perceiving breasts as maternal, and breastfeeding as normative.

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The 1983 Pine Gap Women’s Peace Camp held in central Australia was inspired by Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp in the UK and conceived as one of its international support actions. In this chapter, however, I want to reorient this origin story to remember it as a protest site on Aboriginal land rather than one primarily derived from Greenham Common. Protest camps are capable of holding multiple meanings and reorienting the focus can produce new insights and engagements. This particular feature, of Australia’s relatively recent colonising history, differentiates the politics of Australian protest camps from other global protests. Taking three key ‘scenes’ from the archives of the Pine Gap protest camp around racism, men and policing, this chapter constructs key encounters between women protestors through their entanglements and engagements while doing feminism on Aboriginal land.

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In this conclusion, we first sketch out some of the feminist lines of sight on protest camps that the preceding chapters open up before unpicking some of the different stories about feminist mobilisation that emerge from attention to its entanglement with camps. In this way, we show how the book not only engages with protest camps anew, in terms both of their constraints and their limitations, but also reimagines feminism and its relation to protest and camps. We close by briefly suggesting some lines of further inquiry.

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This groundbreaking collection interrogates protest camps as sites of gendered politics and feminist activism.

Drawing on case studies that range from Cold War women-only peace camps to more recent mixed-gender examples from around the world, diverse contributors reflect on the recurrence of gendered, racialised and heteronormative structures in protest camps, and their potency and politics as feminist spaces.

While developing an intersectional analysis of the possibilities and limitations of protest camps, this book also tells new and inspiring stories of feminist organising and agency. It will appeal to feminist theorists and activists, as well as to social movement scholars.

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This groundbreaking collection interrogates protest camps as sites of gendered politics and feminist activism.

Drawing on case studies that range from Cold War women-only peace camps to more recent mixed-gender examples from around the world, diverse contributors reflect on the recurrence of gendered, racialised and heteronormative structures in protest camps, and their potency and politics as feminist spaces.

While developing an intersectional analysis of the possibilities and limitations of protest camps, this book also tells new and inspiring stories of feminist organising and agency. It will appeal to feminist theorists and activists, as well as to social movement scholars.

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This groundbreaking collection interrogates protest camps as sites of gendered politics and feminist activism.

Drawing on case studies that range from Cold War women-only peace camps to more recent mixed-gender examples from around the world, diverse contributors reflect on the recurrence of gendered, racialised and heteronormative structures in protest camps, and their potency and politics as feminist spaces.

While developing an intersectional analysis of the possibilities and limitations of protest camps, this book also tells new and inspiring stories of feminist organising and agency. It will appeal to feminist theorists and activists, as well as to social movement scholars.

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This groundbreaking collection interrogates protest camps as sites of gendered politics and feminist activism.

Drawing on case studies that range from Cold War women-only peace camps to more recent mixed-gender examples from around the world, diverse contributors reflect on the recurrence of gendered, racialised and heteronormative structures in protest camps, and their potency and politics as feminist spaces.

While developing an intersectional analysis of the possibilities and limitations of protest camps, this book also tells new and inspiring stories of feminist organising and agency. It will appeal to feminist theorists and activists, as well as to social movement scholars.

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Entanglements, Critiques and Re-Imaginings

This ground-breaking collection interrogates protest camps as sites of gendered politics and feminist activism.

Drawing on case studies that range from Cold War women-only peace camps to more recent mixed-gender examples from around the world, diverse contributors reflect on the recurrence of gendered, racialised and heteronormative structures in protest camps, and their potency and politics as feminist spaces.

While developing an intersectional analysis of the possibilities and limitations of protest camps, this book also tells new and inspiring stories of feminist organising and agency. It will appeal to feminist theorists and activists, as well as to social movement scholars.

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This Introduction establishes the empirical and theoretical context of our collective project on feminism and protest camps. We begin by exploring the recent history of protest camps and explaining why a feminist revisiting is necessary. We then establish the shared parameters of the feminist approach adopted by contributors, before explaining the organising themes of the book and highlighting some of the empirical and conceptual contributions of the chapters.

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In 2018, Cornish feminist production hub Scary Little Girls, in partnership with online women’s history publication, The Heroine Collective, launched an ambitious project to record testimonies of women who formed the Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp between 1981 and 2000. The aim was to retrieve a history of radical feminist peace activism in danger of being lost from public memory and from British protest culture, and to bring this heritage to new audiences. The work thus involved not only recording interview testimonies, but also creative outreach – an online archive, maintained by a non-profit organisation; theatrical events and concerts; a multimedia exhibition and interactive virtual reality website; and a book. This chapter takes the form of a conversation between Rebecca Mordan from Scary Little Girls, Kate Kerrow from The Heroine Collective, Vanessa Pini from Greenham Women Everywhere, and Greenham woman Jill (Ray) Raymond, facilitated by Alison Bartlett and Catherine Eschle. The conversation explores the processes and ethics of interviewing and digs into the multimedia and collaging techniques through which the lived experiences of campers were recreated years after the event. Finally, we discuss the politics of forgetting and remembering Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp, and its legacies.

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