Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 24 items for

  • Author or Editor: Alistair Harkness x
Clear All Modify Search
International Critical Perspectives in Rural Criminology

What are the theoretical and conceptual framings of rural criminology across the world? Thinking creatively about the challenges of rural crime and policing, in this stimulating collection of essays experts in this emerging field draw from theories of modernity, feminism, climate change, left realism and globalisation.

This first book in the Research in Rural Crime series offers state-of-the-art scholarship from across the globe, and considers the future agenda for the discipline.

Restricted access

The shape of rural communities depends greatly on what is practised everyday by rural people. In addition to everyday life, rural areas are structured by the actions of states, by the economy and technology – and so we must regard the rural as a distinct socio-spatiality. Moreover, the rural is connected to and shaped by local and global forces that organise both in and beyond its boundaries. The rural therefore intersects with economy, environment and politics at the macro level, but also with gender, class and ethnicity and with struggles for power, resources and identity that shapes its cohesion and (in)security. This chapter is structured in three parts. First, it reflects upon the rural as a socio-spatial nexus comprised of rural practices and shaped by the external world and the state. Here, the chapter reflects further on the shared space between rural and green criminology with reference to the Anthropocene. Second, it considers some of the ways in which the rural and rural people are represented in popular discourse. It contemplates some of these themes through the lens of rural criminology. Third, the chapter provides an overview of the various contributions in this book.

Restricted access

Farm crime refers to criminal offending which impacts upon the function of the pastoral, agricultural and aquaculture industries. Common forms of victimization include trespassing, illegal shooting and hunting, breaking and entering, the theft of equipment and tools, with livestock theft being the ‘quintessential rural crime’, as well as the theft of farm supplies and inputs (such as fencing supplies, chemicals and fuel), firearms, water, fruit crops and personal items. Farm crime devastates lives and communities in rural settings, provincial towns, smaller urbanized regional areas and at the urban fringe. Offending on farming sites has been largely forgotten historically in the canon of scholarly literature, although it is now receiving far greater attention, not least because of the financial implications for farming communities but also for its psychological and sociological impacts. Aspects of locational context and cultural geography have deeply shaped incidents and responses to crime in rural spaces. This is especially true of farms where the tyranny of distance, lack of access to public services, dense acquaintanceship networks and ideals of self-sufficiency are salient. Evidence also suggests a significant ‘dark figure of crime’ in rural spaces (where crime occurs but is not reported and recorded), and sometimes strained relationships between the police and the policed.

Restricted access

The dominant images of tourism are romanticized visions of majestic mountains, azure oceans, white sand beaches, historic monuments, grand examples of architecture, exotic cultural settings and, of course, a happy, smiling tourist couple or parents with children in-hand, enthralled by the wonders before them. Nowhere in a brochure is there an image of a tourist frantically searching for his attaché case which housed his laptop, stolen whilst he waited in line to register at a hotel, or the panicked visage of a woman whose wallet is missing from a purse slung over her shoulders whilst she stood with a group of her friends about to board an excursion boat – both were the victims of well-trained and experienced thieves, individuals whose presence is as ubiquitous as the attractions themselves. As Jones, Barclay and Mawby point out (2012), where there is tourism there will be crime. There should be nothing unusual about that observation, because all human endeavours display examples of deviance and crime. Further, as noted by many scholars interested in the criminological dimensions of tourism (see Sharpley and Stone, 2009), a great deal of tourism itself makes money off of heinous crimes, such as tours of the streets of London where Jack the Ripper stalked his victims in the late 1880s, or the house where Lizzie Borden allegedly killed her parents with an axe in the town of Fall River, Massachusetts (there is even a children’s rhyme about that case). One distinction to be made is the difference between leisure and tourism (see Botterill and Jones, 2010).

Restricted access

The key reference guide to rural crime and rural justice, this encyclopedia includes 85 concise and informative entries covering rural crime theories, offences and control. It is divided into five complementary sections:

  • theories of rural crime;

  • rural crime studies;

  • rural criminal justice studies and responses;

  • rural people and groups;

  • rural criminological research.

With contributions from established and emerging international scholars, this authoritative guide offers state-of-the-art synopses of the key issues in rural crime, criminology, offending and victimisation, and both institutional and informal responses to rural crime.

Restricted access

This chapter focuses on the provision of punishment (specifically imprisonment) in rural settings, considering the roles of politics and populism in the delivery of justice outcomes and the impacts on rural communities. It conceptualises the politics of punishment in three key areas: public sentiments and punitive attitudes; the political and socio-economic influences on prison siting in rural areas; and rural prison and post-release challenges. It argues that governmental decision-making often is led by economic factors without necessarily considering social impacts, and that considerations of rural punishment and prisons are both complex and nuanced.

Restricted access

This chapter contemplates the past, present and future of rural criminology, considering its transformation from a niche area of interest in the criminological field, oft overlooked, to what has become a burgeoning subdiscipline in its own right with an enviable growth trajectory. It reflects on the chance encounters that have brought together scholars and others from disparate academic spaces and geographic places to study rural crime. In so doing, it considers the notion of borders in a globalised world, the role and importance of networks, rural criminology as public criminology. The chapter contemplates what the future might hold, and recommends several actions to facilitate its advancement well into the twenty-first century. Even in a globalised world, both physical and intangible borders persist. Sometimes these borders can be glaringly obvious, some are curious, and others are controversial and contentious both historically and now. Borders also serve as metaphors for the divisions imposed in the academy. The chapter muses on how rural criminology provides an effective crossing of our own boundaries, and in the process how it has created an inclusive and dynamic space for research, scholarship and practice.

Restricted access

There exists scant contemporary empirical consideration of the impacts of illegal hunting or shooting, such as damage to environments; harm to animals (native and livestock); risks of self-harm; harms to people and property; or the role of organized criminal elements. There is, though, a large volume of research related to illegal poaching, particularly poaching of endangered fauna in Africa and East Asia which has attracted transnational criminal elements. A differentiation between poaching and illegal hunting needs to be acknowledged: the former addresses notions of theft for profit; the latter often involves non-economic motivations and, in various instances, can be considered a ‘folk crime’, a form of political dissent, or resistance to conservation measures (see Pohja-Mykrä, 2016).

Restricted access