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  • Author or Editor: Anne-Marie Cummins x
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This piece is a personal response to the articles in this special issue of the Journal of Psychosocial Studies. It identifies three themes that seem to unite the articles: children’s emotional labour; repair and generativity; and après-coup or Nachträglichkeit. It is also suggested that there is an absence – the shadow of envy, competition and rivalry, which also tends to run through the matrix of so many mother–daughter and supervisor–supervisee relations. Further, it is suggested that any future iterations of these relationships would be enriched by integrating contributions on the ways in which not only collusion, competition and oedipal struggles, but also hierarchy and asymmetry are especially problematic sources of psychic pain when women supervise women.

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This chapter explores the role of publically engaged social science in the development of a new Foundation Degree in Therapeutic Child Care, jointly developed by the University of the West of England and the Mulberry Bush School in Oxford. It discusses the development of the collaboration, the social-scientific ideas that informed it, the impact of the degree on the school and its work and the lessons that can be drawn about publically engaged partnership between the social sciences and residential and therapeutic child care.

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Arguably, partnerships emerged to address knowledge deficits inherent in other modes of coordination, in understanding between different agencies and arms of government (‘silo mentality’), and between government and the people it serves. As an increasingly prevalent form of governance, there is concern about whether partnerships produce benefits that contribute to the public good. This article considers their value in producing intangible assets in the form of knowledge. Tacit, embodied knowledge enhances an individual's capacity to act. Using the concept of intangible assets, we propose a more relational approach to understanding governance that challenges the current instrumentalist thinking within the UK Labour government's modernisation agenda.

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