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  • Author or Editor: Anthea Innes x
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Authors: Ben Hicks and Anthea Innes

This chapter discusses the process of developing collaborative working relationships with a particularly hard-to-reach population; rural-dwelling older men with dementia. It draws on theoretical knowledge around masculinities as well as reflexive practice undertaken in rural areas within the UK to detail potential challenges facilitators may be faced with when engaging this population. It concludes by providing a list of recommendations for facilitators to consider when delivering community initiatives to rural-dwelling older men with dementia.

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Policy, Research and Practice

As the number of people affected by dementia continues to rise, this is the first in-depth examination of related services dedicated to the unique demands of remote and rural settings.

Contributors from the UK, Australia, North America and Europe explore the experiences and requirements of those living with dementia and those caring for them in personal and professional capacities in challenging geographical locations. For practitioners, researchers, academics and policy makers, this book is an essential review of evidence and strategies to date, and a guide to future research needs and opportunities for improvements in rural dementia practice.

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This chapter summarises key themes across rural and remote dementia care internationally. It highlights consistent issues as well as innovations and points to note, across the three areas of policy, practice and research. The chapter concludes there is still significant work to be done in finding and translating new models for providing high quality rural dementia care and thus good experiences for people with dementia, carers and communities. The chapter throws down the gauntlet inviting more research and study in this area.

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As the number of people affected by dementia continues to rise, this is the first in-depth examination of related services dedicated to the unique demands of remote and rural settings. Contributors from the UK, Australia, North America and Europe explore the experiences and requirements of those living with dementia and those caring for them in personal and professional capacities in challenging geographical locations. For practitioners, researchers, academics and policy makers, this book is an essential review of evidence and strategies to date, and a guide to future research needs and opportunities for improvements in rural dementia practice.

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As the number of people affected by dementia continues to rise, this is the first in-depth examination of related services dedicated to the unique demands of remote and rural settings. Contributors from the UK, Australia, North America and Europe explore the experiences and requirements of those living with dementia and those caring for them in personal and professional capacities in challenging geographical locations. For practitioners, researchers, academics and policy makers, this book is an essential review of evidence and strategies to date, and a guide to future research needs and opportunities for improvements in rural dementia practice.

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As the number of people affected by dementia continues to rise, this is the first in-depth examination of related services dedicated to the unique demands of remote and rural settings. Contributors from the UK, Australia, North America and Europe explore the experiences and requirements of those living with dementia and those caring for them in personal and professional capacities in challenging geographical locations. For practitioners, researchers, academics and policy makers, this book is an essential review of evidence and strategies to date, and a guide to future research needs and opportunities for improvements in rural dementia practice.

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As the number of people affected by dementia continues to rise, this is the first in-depth examination of related services dedicated to the unique demands of remote and rural settings. Contributors from the UK, Australia, North America and Europe explore the experiences and requirements of those living with dementia and those caring for them in personal and professional capacities in challenging geographical locations. For practitioners, researchers, academics and policy makers, this book is an essential review of evidence and strategies to date, and a guide to future research needs and opportunities for improvements in rural dementia practice.

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This chapter sets out the need for a focus on remote and rural dementia care. It highlights the need to consider the interconnections between policy, practice and research evidence and the lived experience of people living with dementia in remote and rural areas. The chapter provides an overview of the structure and aims of the book.

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As the number of people affected by dementia continues to rise, this is the first in-depth examination of related services dedicated to the unique demands of remote and rural settings. Contributors from the UK, Australia, North America and Europe explore the experiences and requirements of those living with dementia and those caring for them in personal and professional capacities in challenging geographical locations. For practitioners, researchers, academics and policy makers, this book is an essential review of evidence and strategies to date, and a guide to future research needs and opportunities for improvements in rural dementia practice.

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Informal care partners of individuals with dementia are often referred to as the ‘invisible patient’, whose needs are under-represented in research. The physical, mental and emotional responsibilities of caring for someone with dementia can be both rewarding and challenging. This qualitative study explored how attending a dementia cafe affected care partner well-being. The co-designed cafe adopted a person-centred approach, valuing members’ unique abilities and contributions. Results showed that the cafe provided a safe environment where individuals could be themselves. Participants found a sense of belonging, camaraderie and friendship that enhanced their sense of well-being and maintained their selfhood and dignity.

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