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Author: Bianca Fileborn

This article examines street harassment victims’ experiences of bystander intervention in incidents of harassment. Drawing on the findings of a mixed-methods pilot study undertaken in Melbourne, Australia, it considers what forms these interventions took and the impact(s) they had on the harassment. It examines the impact(s) that bystander intervention had on participants. Findings suggest that bystander intervention is not common in incidents of street harassment. When it does occur, its impact is highly variable. Yet, bystander intervention is also central in informing victims’ perceptions of safety, harm and justice. These findings present some important implications and complexities for bystander research and education and these are considered in closing.

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A Multi-Disciplinary Perspective

What role does physical and virtual space play in gender-based violence (GBV)? Experts from the Global North and South use wide-ranging case studies – from public harassment in India and Kenya to the role of Twitter users in women’s harassment – to examine how spaces can facilitate or prevent GBV and showcase strategies for prevention and intervention from women and LGBTQ+ people.

Students and academics from a range of disciplines will discover how existing research connects with practice and policy developments, the current gaps in research and a future agenda for GBV studies.

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Since the 1980s there has been a rapid increase in the available evidence about the prevalence, causes, impacts and responses to gender-based violence (GBV). Despite the explosion of research in this field – and vital contributions from feminist geographers – space and place remain important, yet overlooked, elements of GBV. This edited collection provides an inter- and multidisciplinary international collection of chapters that foregrounds space and place in the analysis of gender-based violence. Contributors examine core questions relating to the role(s) that space and place-based factors might play in facilitating and producing experiences of violence, with attendant implications for prevention and intervention. Contributions to this collection consider how space and place may be productive in the perpetration of gendered violence, as well as shaping how gendered violence is lived and understood by survivors. With an analytic focus spanning the local, national and transnational, this volume brings together diverse perspectives and ways of understanding the interconnections between space, place and gender-based violence.

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Since the 1980s there has been a rapid increase in the available evidence about the prevalence, causes, impacts and responses to gender-based violence (GBV). Despite the explosion of research in this field – and vital contributions from feminist geographers – space and place remain important, yet overlooked, elements of GBV. This edited collection provides an inter- and multidisciplinary international collection of chapters that foregrounds space and place in the analysis of gender-based violence. Contributors examine core questions relating to the role(s) that space and place-based factors might play in facilitating and producing experiences of violence, with attendant implications for prevention and intervention. Contributions to this collection consider how space and place may be productive in the perpetration of gendered violence, as well as shaping how gendered violence is lived and understood by survivors. With an analytic focus spanning the local, national and transnational, this volume brings together diverse perspectives and ways of understanding the interconnections between space, place and gender-based violence.

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Since the 1980s there has been a rapid increase in the available evidence about the prevalence, causes, impacts and responses to gender-based violence (GBV). Despite the explosion of research in this field – and vital contributions from feminist geographers – space and place remain important, yet overlooked, elements of GBV. This edited collection provides an inter- and multidisciplinary international collection of chapters that foregrounds space and place in the analysis of gender-based violence. Contributors examine core questions relating to the role(s) that space and place-based factors might play in facilitating and producing experiences of violence, with attendant implications for prevention and intervention. Contributions to this collection consider how space and place may be productive in the perpetration of gendered violence, as well as shaping how gendered violence is lived and understood by survivors. With an analytic focus spanning the local, national and transnational, this volume brings together diverse perspectives and ways of understanding the interconnections between space, place and gender-based violence.

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Since the 1980s there has been a rapid increase in the available evidence about the prevalence, causes, impacts and responses to gender-based violence (GBV). Despite the explosion of research in this field – and vital contributions from feminist geographers – space and place remain important, yet overlooked, elements of GBV. This edited collection provides an inter- and multidisciplinary international collection of chapters that foregrounds space and place in the analysis of gender-based violence. Contributors examine core questions relating to the role(s) that space and place-based factors might play in facilitating and producing experiences of violence, with attendant implications for prevention and intervention. Contributions to this collection consider how space and place may be productive in the perpetration of gendered violence, as well as shaping how gendered violence is lived and understood by survivors. With an analytic focus spanning the local, national and transnational, this volume brings together diverse perspectives and ways of understanding the interconnections between space, place and gender-based violence.

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Since the 1980s there has been a rapid increase in the available evidence about the prevalence, causes, impacts and responses to gender-based violence (GBV). Despite the explosion of research in this field – and vital contributions from feminist geographers – space and place remain important, yet overlooked, elements of GBV. This edited collection provides an inter- and multidisciplinary international collection of chapters that foregrounds space and place in the analysis of gender-based violence. Contributors examine core questions relating to the role(s) that space and place-based factors might play in facilitating and producing experiences of violence, with attendant implications for prevention and intervention. Contributions to this collection consider how space and place may be productive in the perpetration of gendered violence, as well as shaping how gendered violence is lived and understood by survivors. With an analytic focus spanning the local, national and transnational, this volume brings together diverse perspectives and ways of understanding the interconnections between space, place and gender-based violence.

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This chapter provides an empirical, theoretical and conceptual framework for this edited collection. We trace the historical context of feminist scholarship on space, place and gender-based violence and consider how these works individually, and collectively, provide a foundation for current understandings of the spatial and temporal features of violence and abuse. We situate the contributions to this edited collection within contemporary debates, global public health and geopolitical issues to showcase the intersections between space, power and inequalities that facilitate gendered abuse and harms. Equally, we consider how space can be reimagined as sites of resistance, activism and justice, and how the contributions to this collection provide us with a future research agenda to achieve this.

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This chapter critiques the move towards the inclusion of misogyny in hate crime legislation and practice. The chapter argues that classifying the harassment and violence that women and girls experience as hate distracts attention from the multiple and complex experiences of violence, hostility and exclusion that women experience in society. The chapter responds to the key claims in feminist campaigns supporting the change, which include both substantive benefits and conceptual purposes of misogyny hate crime. The chapter concludes by proposing a public health approach to violence against women and girls, including improved data gathering, and non-criminal justice system responses, such as education and capacity-building prevention initiatives.

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