Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 18 items for

  • Author or Editor: Carl Petrokofsky x
Clear All Modify Search
Improving Health and Wellbeing

Health and wellbeing are significantly influenced by how professionals plan, design and manage the environment.

This book supports those working in the built environment and public health sectors, with the knowledge and insight to maximise health improvement through planning and land use decisions. Supported by examples of policy and approaches, it focuses on implementation and delivery, and sets out what is needed to achieve healthier environments within the parameters of legislative and policy frameworks.

It demonstrates how when we harness the art and science of public health spatial planning, can we begin to effect changes to the policies and decisions that shape population health.

Restricted access

This chapter explores some of the impacts that environments have on the wider costs that are incurred by society when areas are not planned, designed and built with the underpinning conditions that promote health and wellbeing. Both consumers and the commercial sector increasingly understand and value the benefits of well-designed projects that place a premium on design features that are also good for health. However, there are multiple stakeholders involved in planning projects, and balancing competing priorities across these groups is difficult. The challenge is to identify and articulate how benefits can be realised in ways that maximise the win–wins for all. The chapter gives examples from the development of a regional transport strategy, low-traffic neighbourhoods and the impact of gentrification on communities. From a public health perspective, it is important that practitioners understand the local process and those specific stages in which they can have maximum impact on the development of policies or specific projects. The chapter concludes with some observations on how to develop a local health and planning agenda.

Restricted access

A function of public health spatial planning practice is to help identify and secure value from development to achieve health outcomes. The objective of procuring evidence to support healthy policy creation and decisions on planning applications is being able to identify value from development. This will allow public authorities to secure tangible contributions from developers and those who finance and build those places to support healthy place creation. This chapter describes the principles and processes of planning gain to secure the necessary financial and system investment in elements that promote health. It will highlight the planning mechanisms for financial contributions, with examples of where local authorities have helped secured contributions for health benefit. The chapter presents two insider stories from Andrew Taylor of Countryside Properties and Harry Knibb and Olga Turner Baker to illustrate the opportunities and commitment to leverage value from the Acton Gardens regeneration area and Kent Nature and Wellbeing Centre development to promote health and wellbeing outcomes through nature.

Restricted access

The place in which we live matters to health. This chapter reflects on how the built and natural environment of our neighbourhoods, towns and cities impacts on health and wellbeing, and considers the conditions required to maximise health. These wider determinants of health set the conditions for good health and result from a complex interplay of biological, behavioural, social and environmental factors. There is an increasingly robust public health evidence base upon which to make these assertions and that, in turn, provides a guide to actions that can be taken to improve health and wellbeing through the design and quality of the built environment by means of spatial planning. This chapter sets the wider context by considering the evidence base underpinning the association between the environment and health in the context of the wider determinants, and suggests how this can underpin planning for healthy places.

Restricted access

Spatial planning policy, public health policy and professional priorities have reached a point of convergence that supports the growing movement to reunite local spatial planning and strategies for health and wellbeing. Practitioners are experimenting with creative ways to work within local circumstances and systems to deliver on the priorities that matter most to local communities and are designed to improve health and wellbeing through the planning system. This chapter captures the challenges facing the professional workforce working within the planning system when trying to balance the demands arising from different legislative, policy and skills competency frameworks. These must all be addressed if we are to successfully tackle the challenging public health issues facing this and future generations.

Restricted access

This chapter sets the baseline of the current state of the union and joint working practices between spatial planning and public health, and the extent to which wider political and research landscapes have influenced this union. There is an emerging understanding and evidence base among practitioners and researchers of interventions that work and can be effective in achieving health and wellbeing through spatial planning. What is unknown is how these interventions can and should be applied in different localities under different conditions through the planning system. The unique, place-based composition of the local built and natural environment makes it difficult to develop evidence-based approaches that can be universally applied, and successful practices in one setting may not always be transferrable to another. This chapter synthesises research from academic and practice-based literature to establish an ‘institutional’ memory of the journey in applying the practice of planning for health and wellbeing.

Restricted access

This chapter aims to provide an overview of what Health in All Policies is and its main tools and methods for implementation. It identifies the key drivers for collaboration between spatial planning and public health systems. Health in All Policies is an approach that seeks to improve population health and health equity by looking at public policies across all sectors. It does this by: taking account of the health implications of decisions; seeking synergies between sectors; and avoiding harmful health outcomes and inequalities by mitigating any unintended impacts. It signposts the reader to useful resources that can assist and support practitioners to implement Health in All Policies and use the main tools to drive it forward. The chapter ends with an insider story from Dr Fiona Haigh on integrating health with planning in Australia.

Restricted access

Health impact assessment is a flexible and systematic tool that can be applied to effectively implement ‘Health in All Policies’ and ‘All Policies in Health’ approaches at local, regional and national levels. It considers in an explicit and proactive way populations impacted by development or spatial planning policy and plans, and can address and help to discuss and mitigate any issues before they arise. This chapter outlines the process of a health impact assessment, the roles carried out in a health impact assessment, how it can be used as a beneficial and proportional process to support effective public health spatial planning and decision-making, and its integration in practice.

Restricted access

Definitions and models of health are important when considering and understanding health and wellbeing, and how to integrate them into impact assessments that are relevant to spatial planning. Integrating health into impact assessment at a plan, policy or proposal level can be complicated in nature, being defined not only by an individual’s view of health, but also by that of society, key stakeholders, legislators, policymakers, developers and those commissioned to carry out an impact assessment that has health as an element. This chapter describes how wider health and wellbeing can be integrated into a range of existing impact assessments, including environmental impact assessments and mental wellbeing impact assessments. It introduces two insider stories from Stuart Williams and Gemma Christian on the application of health in strategic environmental assessments in different spatial plans in Wales.

Restricted access

The planning system operates on the primacy of legislative and policy frameworks as the basis for action. This hierarchical nature of spatial planning is a hallmark of the system and dictates how regional/local authorities and stakeholders are able and required to embed health and wellbeing into strategies, plans and policies. This chapter makes the case for the integration of health and wellbeing issues into the policy framework, how to do this and the types of policies needed that are robust and defensible, and that can be tailored to meet local spatial and public health priorities, such as those set out in public health strategies. Most importantly, the chapter provides policymakers and practitioners with the necessary know-how to translate evidence and knowledge into policy and technical requirements. Finally, it provides an eight-stage process for developing planning policies for health that are effective, meaningful and impactful, and that meets the procedural and impact- and outcome-based requirements.

Restricted access