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  • Author or Editor: Casey Charles x
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On a trip to Kenya to participate in a writing workshop, the author, an HIV-positive gay man in his fifties from Montana, finds himself compelled to face the precarious lives of other long-term survivors, attending a support group in the slum of Korogocho, and finding a level of intimacy that leads to a realisation and expression of the uncanny similarity in the different lives of women and men living with the global virus.

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Three case studies from Mumbai illustrate the effects of immunosenescence on long-term HIV survivors. Many of the medical, psychological and social characteristics of ageing characterise the condition of positive women and men in their thirties and forties, demonstrating the way age is in many ways a social construct, but also showing how long-term survival depends on social support networks, like the community-based organisation Sanjeevani, which promotes intimacy and activism.

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Following the development of anti-retroviral therapies (ARVs), many people affected by HIV in the 1980s and 1990s have now been living with the condition for decades.

Drawing on perspectives from leading scholars in Bangladesh, Canada, Hong Kong, New Zealand, Switzerland, Ukraine, the UK and the US, as well as research from India and Kenya, this book explores the experiences of sex and sexuality in individuals and groups living with HIV in later life (50+). Contributions consider the impacts of stigma, barriers to intimacy, physiological sequelae, long-term care, undetectability, pleasure and biomedical prevention (TasP and PrEP).

With increasing global availability of ARVs and ageing populations, this book offers essential future directions, practical applications and implications for both policy and research.

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This volume, third in a series of five on sexuality in later life, brings together the experiences of women, gay men, trans women and hijra from around the world as they describe what it means to live with HIV and navigate the often fraught areas of sex, sexuality, intimacy and relationships in later life. New drug treatments have transformed the lives and expectations of people living with HIV. In this book we hear from people living in Aotearoa New Zealand, Bangladesh, India, Kenya, Switzerland, Ukraine and the United Kingdom who are not only living with HIV but also facing stigma imposed on them by others. Too often they have learned to stigmatise themselves. Since no single approach or way of writing can capture the richly diverse experiences of people in later life living with HIV, the book includes a variety of empirical research as well as personal accounts, poetry and other forms of writing from an array of perspectives and academic disciplines. As always with HIV, we find that poverty challenges our notions about the length, expectations and quality of life.

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This volume, third in a series of five on sexuality in later life, brings together the experiences of women, gay men, trans women and hijra from around the world as they describe what it means to live with HIV and navigate the often fraught areas of sex, sexuality, intimacy and relationships in later life. New drug treatments have transformed the lives and expectations of people living with HIV. In this book we hear from people living in Aotearoa New Zealand, Bangladesh, India, Kenya, Switzerland, Ukraine and the United Kingdom who are not only living with HIV but also facing stigma imposed on them by others. Too often they have learned to stigmatise themselves. Since no single approach or way of writing can capture the richly diverse experiences of people in later life living with HIV, the book includes a variety of empirical research as well as personal accounts, poetry and other forms of writing from an array of perspectives and academic disciplines. As always with HIV, we find that poverty challenges our notions about the length, expectations and quality of life.

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This volume, third in a series of five on sexuality in later life, brings together the experiences of women, gay men, trans women and hijra from around the world as they describe what it means to live with HIV and navigate the often fraught areas of sex, sexuality, intimacy and relationships in later life. New drug treatments have transformed the lives and expectations of people living with HIV. In this book we hear from people living in Aotearoa New Zealand, Bangladesh, India, Kenya, Switzerland, Ukraine and the United Kingdom who are not only living with HIV but also facing stigma imposed on them by others. Too often they have learned to stigmatise themselves. Since no single approach or way of writing can capture the richly diverse experiences of people in later life living with HIV, the book includes a variety of empirical research as well as personal accounts, poetry and other forms of writing from an array of perspectives and academic disciplines. As always with HIV, we find that poverty challenges our notions about the length, expectations and quality of life.

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The idea of writing about the lives of older people living with HIV for much or most of their lives would have been unthinkable in the earliest years of the pandemic. Yet we are here now because new technologies allow people living with HIV to live longer and because, as people are sexually active throughout their entire lives, they are being diagnosed in later life. As people live longer, practical and policy support for older persons and their sexual lives will be increasingly important. Authors in this volume also point out that in parts of the world, later life does not refer to being older in years. Experiences of intersectional stigma and oppression are common throughout the world. The introduction concludes by introducing the chapters that make up the volume.

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