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This chapter brings feminist literatures on domestic space and the gendered division of labour into dialogue with research into protest camps. It responds to a groundbreaking account of protest camps by Anna Feigenbaum and colleagues (2013), which argues that social reproduction is integral to the political effect of camps. Yet this point remains insufficiently interrogated in their framework; as a result, gendered and racialised inequalities and insecurities in protest camps are not fully explained, and continuities with the wider neoliberal capitalist context are downplayed. In this chapter, I draw on Marxist and Black/anti-racist feminist research to examine the ways in and extent to which social reproduction was reconstructed in two protest camps in my locality, Occupy Glasgow and Faslane Peace Camp. This allows for some wider lessons to be drawn about the structural limitations of protest camps as sites of resistance to neoliberal capitalism and austerity politics.

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In this conclusion, we first sketch out some of the feminist lines of sight on protest camps that the preceding chapters open up before unpicking some of the different stories about feminist mobilisation that emerge from attention to its entanglement with camps. In this way, we show how the book not only engages with protest camps anew, in terms both of their constraints and their limitations, but also reimagines feminism and its relation to protest and camps. We close by briefly suggesting some lines of further inquiry.

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This groundbreaking collection interrogates protest camps as sites of gendered politics and feminist activism.

Drawing on case studies that range from Cold War women-only peace camps to more recent mixed-gender examples from around the world, diverse contributors reflect on the recurrence of gendered, racialised and heteronormative structures in protest camps, and their potency and politics as feminist spaces.

While developing an intersectional analysis of the possibilities and limitations of protest camps, this book also tells new and inspiring stories of feminist organising and agency. It will appeal to feminist theorists and activists, as well as to social movement scholars.

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This groundbreaking collection interrogates protest camps as sites of gendered politics and feminist activism.

Drawing on case studies that range from Cold War women-only peace camps to more recent mixed-gender examples from around the world, diverse contributors reflect on the recurrence of gendered, racialised and heteronormative structures in protest camps, and their potency and politics as feminist spaces.

While developing an intersectional analysis of the possibilities and limitations of protest camps, this book also tells new and inspiring stories of feminist organising and agency. It will appeal to feminist theorists and activists, as well as to social movement scholars.

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This groundbreaking collection interrogates protest camps as sites of gendered politics and feminist activism.

Drawing on case studies that range from Cold War women-only peace camps to more recent mixed-gender examples from around the world, diverse contributors reflect on the recurrence of gendered, racialised and heteronormative structures in protest camps, and their potency and politics as feminist spaces.

While developing an intersectional analysis of the possibilities and limitations of protest camps, this book also tells new and inspiring stories of feminist organising and agency. It will appeal to feminist theorists and activists, as well as to social movement scholars.

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This groundbreaking collection interrogates protest camps as sites of gendered politics and feminist activism.

Drawing on case studies that range from Cold War women-only peace camps to more recent mixed-gender examples from around the world, diverse contributors reflect on the recurrence of gendered, racialised and heteronormative structures in protest camps, and their potency and politics as feminist spaces.

While developing an intersectional analysis of the possibilities and limitations of protest camps, this book also tells new and inspiring stories of feminist organising and agency. It will appeal to feminist theorists and activists, as well as to social movement scholars.

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This article reviews contemporary academic debates about feminist organising in and against neoliberalism, which we see as structured by a co-optation–resistance dichotomy. We outline three narratives: a high-profile ‘strong’ co-optation thesis; a more nuanced co-optation discourse; and an emergent counter-narrative of resistance. While sympathetic to the latter two, we critically unpack the account of neoliberalism, of feminist protagonists and of where feminist activism takes place in all three. We sketch out ways in which neoliberalism and the ‘who’ and ‘where’ of feminism might be considered differently, and argue overall for the need to move beyond the co-optation–resistance dichotomy.

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Entanglements, Critiques and Re-Imaginings

This ground-breaking collection interrogates protest camps as sites of gendered politics and feminist activism.

Drawing on case studies that range from Cold War women-only peace camps to more recent mixed-gender examples from around the world, diverse contributors reflect on the recurrence of gendered, racialised and heteronormative structures in protest camps, and their potency and politics as feminist spaces.

While developing an intersectional analysis of the possibilities and limitations of protest camps, this book also tells new and inspiring stories of feminist organising and agency. It will appeal to feminist theorists and activists, as well as to social movement scholars.

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This Introduction establishes the empirical and theoretical context of our collective project on feminism and protest camps. We begin by exploring the recent history of protest camps and explaining why a feminist revisiting is necessary. We then establish the shared parameters of the feminist approach adopted by contributors, before explaining the organising themes of the book and highlighting some of the empirical and conceptual contributions of the chapters.

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In 2018, Cornish feminist production hub Scary Little Girls, in partnership with online women’s history publication, The Heroine Collective, launched an ambitious project to record testimonies of women who formed the Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp between 1981 and 2000. The aim was to retrieve a history of radical feminist peace activism in danger of being lost from public memory and from British protest culture, and to bring this heritage to new audiences. The work thus involved not only recording interview testimonies, but also creative outreach – an online archive, maintained by a non-profit organisation; theatrical events and concerts; a multimedia exhibition and interactive virtual reality website; and a book. This chapter takes the form of a conversation between Rebecca Mordan from Scary Little Girls, Kate Kerrow from The Heroine Collective, Vanessa Pini from Greenham Women Everywhere, and Greenham woman Jill (Ray) Raymond, facilitated by Alison Bartlett and Catherine Eschle. The conversation explores the processes and ethics of interviewing and digs into the multimedia and collaging techniques through which the lived experiences of campers were recreated years after the event. Finally, we discuss the politics of forgetting and remembering Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp, and its legacies.

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