Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 26 items for

  • Author or Editor: Chris Miller x
Clear All Modify Search
Author:

English

In a world portrayed as diverse and complex, in which power is diffused, governance can be achieved only by building on formal inter-sectoral partnerships. These must involve all stakeholders including those previously excluded from decision making and will therefore present new challenges. Urban regeneration provides a good testing ground for evaluating such partnerships in action and their capacity to act as vehicles for building a new local power base. This article considers the dilemmas that arise from the introduction of the voluntary sector in formal partnerships. It argues that, based on such experiences, much needs to be achieved if effective local regimes are to emerge.

Restricted access
Author:

English

Non-profit organisations are private self-regulating bodies. As their social welfare role expands so the need for greater public transparency and accountability increases. This article concentrates on the relationship between the sector and those stakeholders, beyond government and funding bodies, that are without formal levers of power. It draws upon three Ontario-based case studies that have experienced considerable change and share a strong commitment to self-regulatory accountability to their multiple stakeholders. It illustrates both the importance of particular organisational features and the immense difficulty and complexity of implementing the practice.

Restricted access
Author:

This chapter calls for authentic and sophisticated citizen deliberation in policy making to better address new complexities across public policy and re-visit contemporary understandings of public value. Not only will citizen engagement, relatively weak in Australia, enhance the quality of policy making but will reinvigorate the democratic process at a time of increasing disillusionment with representative government, politicians and the political elite. As an example of failed policy making and the absence of any ‘duty of care’ in working through complex issues requiring fundamental change and adaptation the chapter highlights water reform in the Murray-Darling Basin. Within the broader context the governance-governmentality continuum is explored as well as the attractiveness of ‘localism’ The chapter examines recent government led initiatives in Victoria and Queensland as well as highlighting some popular spaces created from within civil society. The chapter concludes on a pessimistic note that there are few signs of a willingness or capacity to engage in the deepening of democracy as a prerequisite for citizen engagement.

Restricted access
Progressive ideas in the neoliberal ascendency

At a time when neoliberal and conservative politics are again in the ascendency and social democracy is waning, Australian public policy re-engages with the values and goals of progressive public policy in Australia and the difficulties faced in re-affirming them. It brings together leading authors to explore economic, environmental, social, cultural, political and indigenous issues. It examines trends and current policy directions and outlines progressive alternatives that challenge and extend current thinking. While focused on Australia, the contributors offer valuable insights for people in other countries committed to social justice and those engaged in the ongoing contest between neo-liberalism and social democracy. This is essential reading for policy practitioners, researchers and students as well those with an interest in the future of public policy.

Restricted access

This chapter introduces the book Australian Public Policy: Progressive Ideas in the Neoliberal Ascendancy. The chapter examines questions of the status of neoliberalism and social democracy in Australian politics and public policy, recent changes to the Australian policy settlement, and related issues of pragmatism, inertia and process in Australian politics and policy development. Trends and problems in major policy areas – education, economics, cultural and indigenous, social welfare, population, cities, housing and the environment – are examined highlighting the limits of mainstream approaches and the need for more creative and inclusive public and civic responses. Questions of the fragility of the Australian identity and the need for greater cohesion around core social and public values are addressed as issues at the centre of debate about a new progressive policy agenda. While the resilience of Australian society is noted, questions linger about how robust Australian institutions and conventions are in the face of new economic, social and environmental challenges.

Restricted access

This chapter reflects upon the persuasive powers of the global neoliberal zeitgeist in what is broadly a liberal-democratic age. The chapter points to the tensions within this relationship between liberal and democratic values at the heart of contemporary policy making and how other contributors have grappled with them in each of the key policy concerns. It summarises the key arguments as presented across different policy spheres: economics, welfare and work; Indigenous, education, health, housing and childcare; environment and culture, population, immigration and diversity, city and urban development; and our political and public institutions and the hollowing out of the public sphere. The chapter notes too the specificity of Australian neoliberalism with its roots in reforming Labor governments in pursuit of a ‘third-way’ balance between liberal and social democratic thinking. While noting the current domination of neoliberalism the chapter points more optimistically to the positive attitudes to government and social democracy waiting fresh germination. It concludes with a call for progressive perspectives, both liberal and social democratic to rediscover their voices for policies based on a vision of a more just and equitable world.

Restricted access

At a time when neoliberal and conservative politics are again in the ascendency and social democracy is waning, Australian public policy re-engages with the values and goals of progressive public policy in Australia and the difficulties faced in re-affirming them. It brings together leading authors to explore economic, environmental, social, cultural, political and Indigenous issues. It examines trends and current policy directions and outlines progressive alternatives that challenge and extend current thinking. While focused on Australia, the contributors offer valuable insights for people in other countries committed to social justice and those engaged in the ongoing contest between neoliberalism and social democracy. This is essential reading for policy practitioners, researchers and students as well as those with an interest in the future of public policy.

Restricted access

At a time when neoliberal and conservative politics are again in the ascendency and social democracy is waning, Australian public policy re-engages with the values and goals of progressive public policy in Australia and the difficulties faced in re-affirming them. It brings together leading authors to explore economic, environmental, social, cultural, political and Indigenous issues. It examines trends and current policy directions and outlines progressive alternatives that challenge and extend current thinking. While focused on Australia, the contributors offer valuable insights for people in other countries committed to social justice and those engaged in the ongoing contest between neoliberalism and social democracy. This is essential reading for policy practitioners, researchers and students as well as those with an interest in the future of public policy.

Restricted access

At a time when neoliberal and conservative politics are again in the ascendency and social democracy is waning, Australian public policy re-engages with the values and goals of progressive public policy in Australia and the difficulties faced in re-affirming them. It brings together leading authors to explore economic, environmental, social, cultural, political and Indigenous issues. It examines trends and current policy directions and outlines progressive alternatives that challenge and extend current thinking. While focused on Australia, the contributors offer valuable insights for people in other countries committed to social justice and those engaged in the ongoing contest between neoliberalism and social democracy. This is essential reading for policy practitioners, researchers and students as well as those with an interest in the future of public policy.

Restricted access

At a time when neoliberal and conservative politics are again in the ascendency and social democracy is waning, Australian public policy re-engages with the values and goals of progressive public policy in Australia and the difficulties faced in re-affirming them. It brings together leading authors to explore economic, environmental, social, cultural, political and Indigenous issues. It examines trends and current policy directions and outlines progressive alternatives that challenge and extend current thinking. While focused on Australia, the contributors offer valuable insights for people in other countries committed to social justice and those engaged in the ongoing contest between neoliberalism and social democracy. This is essential reading for policy practitioners, researchers and students as well as those with an interest in the future of public policy.

Restricted access