Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for

  • Author or Editor: Christopher Deeming x
Clear All Modify Search

Interest in ‘active ageing’ policy as a means to promote well-being in later life has grown internationally. Britain's Labour government has advocated public, private and third sector partnerships to develop positive opportunities for community participation. This article considers the emerging local response, with interviews and focus groups carried out with active older people and service providers in a deprived, diverse community in East London. Findings help to illustrate some of the benefits of organised activities but tensions were evident where services for older people struggle without core funding.

Restricted access
Moral Conflicts in Global Social Policy

The ongoing social crises and moral conflicts evident in global social policy debates are addressed in this timely volume.

Leading interdisciplinary scholars focus on the ‘social’ of social policy, which is increasingly conceived in a globalised form, as new international agreements and global goals engender social struggles. They tackle pressing ‘social questions’, many of which have been exacerbated by COVID-19, including growing inequality, changing world population, ageing societies, migration and intersectional disadvantage.

This ground-breaking volume critically engages with contested conceptions of the social which are increasingly deployed by international institutions and policy makers. Focusing on social sustainability, social cohesion, social justice, social wellbeing and social progress this text is even more crucial as policy makers look to accelerate socially sustainable solutions to the world’s biggest challenges.

Restricted access

COVID- 19 is a human tragedy, but it has also created a generational opportunity, as UN Secretary- General Antonio Guterres (2020) has observed. An opportunity to build back a more equal and sustainable world. New and emerging socially inclusive models and global policy frameworks are being formulated by policy makers to address the pressing global challenges of the 21st century, such as rising social inequality, extreme poverty and the climate emergency, that focus on important aspects of the social of social policy, are the subject of this volume. This introductory chapter provides a critical introduction to the idea of the ‘social’, and considers how notions of the social are now guiding the development of global social policy for the age of sustainability. The chapter also introduces the different contributions to the evolving debate on the social of social policy and the social dimensions of sustainability that this volume brings together for critical examination and reflection.

The ‘social’ is now becoming more integrated in global social policy debates around sustainability (Koch and Oksana, 2016; Gough, 2017). Often, however, we find conceptions of the ‘social’ are less than welldefined in ascendant discourses of sustainability (Dillard et al, 2008; Vallance et al, 2011). Certainly, the United Nations 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (UNGA, 2015), and the associated 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs, Box 1.1) with their 169 targets adopted by member states of the UN in September 2015, underlines a global commitment to ‘achieving sustainable development in its three dimensions, economic, social and environmental in a balanced and integrated manner’ (UNGA, 2015, 2020; UN, 2019a, 2019b).

Full Access

This chapter addresses the prospects for improved social governance to tackle the global challenges of the 21st century, as humanity moves towards more sustainable patterns of consumption and production, and hopefully a more socially responsible, equitable, inclusive and just world. In particular, the chapter critically examines the emerging social policies being articulated by the Organisation for Economic Co- operation and Development (OECD) in an effort to reform global capitalism. This international organization (a rich- country club) has long been leading and coordinating policy efforts on the global stage, diffusing knowledge to member and non- member states alike with leading expertise to tackle the social, economic and governance challenges of the 21st century (Ougaard, 2010; Clifton and Díaz- Fuentes, 2011; Schmelzer, 2014). It is, at present, in the process of repositioning itself as the international institution responsible for promoting ‘global social justice’; although the issues and questions raised by this are complex, arguably much of it may be about representing a particular set of ‘Western values’ and a particular form of market ideology (see Chapters 6, 8, 11 and 12). Nevertheless, we find the OECD is now shaping important aspects of international governance and global social policy, which is the focus of this chapter, attempting to establish a new global social governance (GSG) architecture in an effort to tackle growing social inequality.

There is no ‘world parliament’ or ‘global government’ (a government of the world) as such, at least at present (Monbiot, 2003; Weiss and Thakur, 2010; Leinen and Bummel, 2018), that can enact legislation in order to tackle the pressing global challenges of the 21st century.

Restricted access

This final chapter draws lessons from across the volume, for thinking through the conceptual ‘lynchpin’ of the ‘social’ and the seismic shifts in social policy over time and space. Here we return to the different conceptualizations of ‘the social’ and ‘the social question’ posed in the different chapters, reflecting further on the ‘social’ in social policy and the struggle for social sustainability in the 21st century. Emerging global social policy frameworks, and proposed pathways and alternatives for accelerating global social progress, are critically examined, alongside current issues and future challenges.

The ‘social question’ (German: Soziale Frage, French: la question sociale, Danish: Arbejderspørgsmaalet, Swedish: arbetarfrågan) constituted the dominant social problem, to be addressed by social reforms in the early 19th century, as we heard in Chapters 1 and 3, with the emergence of social policy in Europe.1 Originally identified with the problem of pauperism that shaped the systems of poor relief in the 19th century (Steinmetz, 1993: ch 3), it then became bound up with ‘the workers question’ or the ‘labour question’ (die Arbeiterfrage, the question of the workers) associated with unemployment (Walters, 2000), which became ‘the international workers question’ under the auspices of the International Labour Organization (ILO) from 1919 (Bellucci and Weiss, 2020). The ‘social question’ was internationalized, key global institutions put ‘the social’ into international activities and programmes, at the ILO but also the League of Nations from 1923 (Miller, 1995), and in the work of the UN from 1945 (Emmerij et al, 2001).

Restricted access

This chapter summarizes the enduring relevance and value of reference budget research. It looks into the approach for establishing adequacy benchmarks and minimum income standards that can help guide the development of national, regional and global social policy. It also emphasizes how the overall minimum budget should attempt to support a specified standard of living. The chapter addresses questions on which commodities or items are required to satisfy “needs” and “necessities” and where can these items be purchased and how much are they likely to cost. It reviews methodological approaches that are often combined in various ways in order to define or benchmark income adequacy.

Restricted access

Research into minimum income standards and reference budgets around the world is compared in this illuminating book. From countries with long established research traditions to places where it is relatively new, the book sets out the different aims and objectives of investigations into the minimum needs and requirements of populations, and the historical contexts, theoretical frameworks and methodological issues that lie behind each approach. For policymakers, practitioners and social policy and poverty academics, this essential review of learnings to date and future prospects for research is all the more relevant in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, testing health and social protection systems around the globe.

Restricted access

Research into minimum income standards and reference budgets around the world is compared in this illuminating book. From countries with long established research traditions to places where it is relatively new, the book sets out the different aims and objectives of investigations into the minimum needs and requirements of populations, and the historical contexts, theoretical frameworks and methodological issues that lie behind each approach. For policymakers, practitioners and social policy and poverty academics, this essential review of learnings to date and future prospects for research is all the more relevant in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, testing health and social protection systems around the globe.

Restricted access

Research into minimum income standards and reference budgets around the world is compared in this illuminating book. From countries with long established research traditions to places where it is relatively new, the book sets out the different aims and objectives of investigations into the minimum needs and requirements of populations, and the historical contexts, theoretical frameworks and methodological issues that lie behind each approach. For policymakers, practitioners and social policy and poverty academics, this essential review of learnings to date and future prospects for research is all the more relevant in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, testing health and social protection systems around the globe.

Restricted access

Research into minimum income standards and reference budgets around the world is compared in this illuminating book. From countries with long established research traditions to places where it is relatively new, the book sets out the different aims and objectives of investigations into the minimum needs and requirements of populations, and the historical contexts, theoretical frameworks and methodological issues that lie behind each approach. For policymakers, practitioners and social policy and poverty academics, this essential review of learnings to date and future prospects for research is all the more relevant in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, testing health and social protection systems around the globe.

Restricted access