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  • Author or Editor: David Buil-Gil x
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Crime research has grown substantially over the past decade, with a rise in evidence-informed approaches to criminal justice, statistics-driven decision-making and predictive analytics. The fuel that has driven this growth is data – and one of its most pressing challenges is the lack of research on the use and interpretation of data sources.

This accessible, engaging book closes that gap for researchers, practitioners and students. International researchers and crime analysts discuss the strengths, perils and opportunities of the data sources and tools now available and their best use in informing sound public policy and criminal justice practice.

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With the rise of evidence-informed approaches to criminal justice, new models of data-driven decision making and the emergence of predictive analytics and other new tools for understanding and employing crime data, the field of crime research has grown substantially over the past decade. The fuel that drives that growth is data. In this edited collection, we present a comprehensive volume of chapters from some of the leading crime scientists from around the world. Researchers, crime analysts and others working with crime data from across four continents and seven countries provide rich discussions of some of the strengths, perils and opportunities provided by the range of data sources, tools, techniques and topics now available. Aimed at a diverse audience – including students, academic researchers, police practitioners, crime analysts and public policy makers – our goal in this book is to make crime data and analysis accessible and interesting. This book will thus appeal to readers who are interested in learning more about the varieties of data types and sources that can and is informing contemporary criminal justice research.

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This chapter first sets out the book’s structure, content and purpose, namely to provide researchers, students and practitioners with the latest state-of-the-art knowledge of the range of crime data sources, tools, techniques and topics now available. The book is divided into four parts: Part 1, titled ‘Crime Data Sources’, comprises seven chapters that examine the strengths and limitations of conventional sources of crime data as well as other types of public data can be used to provide insights into both crime and the criminal justice system. Part 2, ‘Using Crime and Criminal Justice Data’, explores quantitative, qualitative and mixed-methodological approaches to working with a diverse array of data types to shed light on public safety issues and on various criminal justice responses. Part 3, ‘Crime Data in Theory, Policy and Practice’, explores conceptual and theoretical issues related to crime data and its use to build and test theories of crime and deviance, and for everyday policy making and crime-prevention practice. Finally, Part 4, ‘Comparing, Contrasting and Combining Crime Data’, provides opportunities for readers to learn more about the possibilities that can arise through comparing, contrasting and/or combining different forms of data to improve our understanding of crime phenomena.

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With the rise of evidence-informed approaches to criminal justice, new models of data-driven decision making and the emergence of predictive analytics and other new tools for understanding and employing crime data, the field of crime research has grown substantially over the past decade. The fuel that drives that growth is data. In this edited collection, we present a comprehensive volume of chapters from some of the leading crime scientists from around the world. Researchers, crime analysts and others working with crime data from across four continents and seven countries provide rich discussions of some of the strengths, perils and opportunities provided by the range of data sources, tools, techniques and topics now available. Aimed at a diverse audience – including students, academic researchers, police practitioners, crime analysts and public policy makers – our goal in this book is to make crime data and analysis accessible and interesting. This book will thus appeal to readers who are interested in learning more about the varieties of data types and sources that can and is informing contemporary criminal justice research.

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With the rise of evidence-informed approaches to criminal justice, new models of data-driven decision making and the emergence of predictive analytics and other new tools for understanding and employing crime data, the field of crime research has grown substantially over the past decade. The fuel that drives that growth is data. In this edited collection, we present a comprehensive volume of chapters from some of the leading crime scientists from around the world. Researchers, crime analysts and others working with crime data from across four continents and seven countries provide rich discussions of some of the strengths, perils and opportunities provided by the range of data sources, tools, techniques and topics now available. Aimed at a diverse audience – including students, academic researchers, police practitioners, crime analysts and public policy makers – our goal in this book is to make crime data and analysis accessible and interesting. This book will thus appeal to readers who are interested in learning more about the varieties of data types and sources that can and is informing contemporary criminal justice research.

Restricted access

With the rise of evidence-informed approaches to criminal justice, new models of data-driven decision making and the emergence of predictive analytics and other new tools for understanding and employing crime data, the field of crime research has grown substantially over the past decade. The fuel that drives that growth is data. In this edited collection, we present a comprehensive volume of chapters from some of the leading crime scientists from around the world. Researchers, crime analysts and others working with crime data from across four continents and seven countries provide rich discussions of some of the strengths, perils and opportunities provided by the range of data sources, tools, techniques and topics now available. Aimed at a diverse audience – including students, academic researchers, police practitioners, crime analysts and public policy makers – our goal in this book is to make crime data and analysis accessible and interesting. This book will thus appeal to readers who are interested in learning more about the varieties of data types and sources that can and is informing contemporary criminal justice research.

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It is widely known that police recorded crime data provides only a partial picture of the true extent of crimes, with surveys identifying a large number of ‘hidden’ victims. Often referred to as the dark figure of crime, this gap between police records and ‘true’ level of crime has been attributed to a range of influences, including an unwillingness for some victims to report their experiences to the police, coupled with selectivity in police recording practices and errors in the translation of police records into official statistics. Studies have also demonstrated the potentially severe implications of failing to account for these hidden crimes for the veracity of models of crime data. Comparing police records against victim surveys presents us with a potential framework to generate corrected model estimates. But to date we know little about the nature of under-reporting and recording at the local area level, with victim surveys generally only suitable for regional or broad police force-level comparisons. In this chapter we explore a novel solution to this problem, using a synthetic population dataset to examine the extent to which police recording practices vary systematically across England and Wales. Designed to match the UK population on basic demographics as measured by the census, and with each resident given a victimization profile derived from the Crime Survey for England and Wales, this synthetic population enables an examination of the extent of crime undercounting at a range of spatial scales.

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