Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for

  • Author or Editor: Féilim Ó hAdhmaill x
Clear All Modify Search

Chapter 1 provides a critical perspective on the historical development of concepts of human rights. It interrogates the concept of universal human rights, the processes that led to their development and the factors which influence both the development and implementation of international human rights mechanisms. It recognises the contribution of philosophical ideas about humanity, equality, democracy, social justice, etc., as well as the impact of human ‘agency’. It argues that such developments do not take place in a vacuum. Social, economic, ideological, cultural, geo-political considerations and the power to do something about them, all ensure that universal human rights are a contested site both at macro-level in their conceptualisation and the development international human rights oversight mechanisms, but also at micro-level when it comes to the enforceability and realisability of rights on the ground.

Restricted access

Chapter 2 looks at the development of the UN after World War Two and the subsequent development of the UN Declaration of Human Rights (1948), the various Covenants, Conventions and monitoring committees particularly since the end of the Cold War and increased international oversight of rights. It looks at the geopolitical, ideological and cultural factors that have influenced the development of UN Human Rights mechanisms as well as providing a critical analysis of human rights enforcement and realisability. It introduces some of the debates around the articulation of rights - cultural relativism vs universality, individual vs collective rights, socio-economic vs civil and political rights, etc.

Restricted access

Chapter 6 discusses the historical development of universal human rights protections during warfare through the establishment of International Humanitarian Law. It critically assesses the challenges posed to such protections by powerful states, geo-political considerations and the changing nature of war and conflict. It examines the operation of the International Criminal Court, the role of the UN Security Council and the geo-political manipulation of the UN by the USA and others, using the case of the Israel/Palestine conflict as but one example. In a world where most armed conflicts now involve non-state actors and casualties are overwhelmingly civilians, it also critically assesses attempts to reform IHL through, for example, the 1977 Protocols and the limitations of such reform.

Restricted access

International Human Rights Law is supposed to operate at all times. However, during war/conflict it is often suspended to address an ‘emergency’. International Humanitarian Law attempts to deal with human rights protections during the specific circumstances of war. However, what happens when states refuse to recognise a conflict situation as a ‘war’? In a world where violent conflict increasingly involves non-state actors, where does that leave existing international human rights’ mechanisms? This chapter looks at the changing forms of conflict globally and the development of what has been termed ‘terrorism’. It critically assesses the concept of ‘terrorism’ and discusses the difficulties it poses for social science, universal human rights and the development of equality, stability and global peace.

Restricted access

From a Critical Social Policy perspective and with a Global Development remit, this book addresses a range of key questions regarding international human rights. With human rights constantly under challenge, this collection of chapters represent a comprehensive critique that adds a social policy perspective to recent political and legalistic analysis. Expert contributors draw on local and global examples to review constructs of universal rights and their impact on social policy and human welfare. With thorough analysis of their strengths, weaknesses and enforcement, it sets out their role in domestic and geo-political affairs. For those with an interest in social policy, ethics, development, politics and international relations, this is an honest appraisal of both the concepts of international human rights and their realities.

Restricted access

From a Critical Social Policy perspective and with a Global Development remit, this book addresses a range of key questions regarding international human rights. With human rights constantly under challenge, this collection of chapters represent a comprehensive critique that adds a social policy perspective to recent political and legalistic analysis. Expert contributors draw on local and global examples to review constructs of universal rights and their impact on social policy and human welfare. With thorough analysis of their strengths, weaknesses and enforcement, it sets out their role in domestic and geo-political affairs. For those with an interest in social policy, ethics, development, politics and international relations, this is an honest appraisal of both the concepts of international human rights and their realities.

Restricted access

From a Critical Social Policy perspective and with a Global Development remit, this book addresses a range of key questions regarding international human rights. With human rights constantly under challenge, this collection of chapters represent a comprehensive critique that adds a social policy perspective to recent political and legalistic analysis. Expert contributors draw on local and global examples to review constructs of universal rights and their impact on social policy and human welfare. With thorough analysis of their strengths, weaknesses and enforcement, it sets out their role in domestic and geo-political affairs. For those with an interest in social policy, ethics, development, politics and international relations, this is an honest appraisal of both the concepts of international human rights and their realities.

Restricted access
Critical Perspectives

With international human rights under challenge, this book represents a comprehensive critique that adds a social policy perspective to recent political and legalistic analysis.

Expert contributors draw on local and global examples to review constructs of universal rights and their impact on social policy and human welfare. With thorough analysis of their strengths, weaknesses and enforcement, it sets out their role in domestic and geopolitical affairs.

Including a forward by Albie Sachs, this book presents an honest appraisal of both the concepts of international human rights and their realities. It will engage those with an interest in social policy, ethics, politics, international relations, civil society organisations and human rights-based approaches to campaigning and policy development.

Restricted access

The notion of universal human rights, applicable to all and promoted as an answer to future global peace, security and sustainability after World War Two, continues to be a work in progress in a deeply divided and unequal world. Attempts to establish international human rights standards and enforcement mechanisms by the UN and then other regional bodies such as the Council of Europe (CoE) have been beset by a range of different obstacles. Different cultures, ideologies and socioeconomic contexts, geopolitical rivalries and the unequal distribution of power and wealth globally all influence the establishment of ‘rights’ and their realisability. In the Global South, the legacy of colonialism and ongoing neocolonialism have often contributed to weak states, dictatorial rulers and gross inequalities, exacerbated by a dominating global market system. In such circumstances, even the most basic human rights –​ such as the rights to life, health and education –​ have been denied to large sections of the population. Massive global inequalities exist in access to rights –​ whether civil and political, but especially social and economic. It is therefore not surprising that as states have struggled to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic, human rights concerns have emerged in terms of what governments have and have not done, and how global institutions have fared in ensuring human rights protections in the global community.

Open access