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  • Author or Editor: Femida Handy x
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This study investigates the association between the integration of first-generation immigrants and their volunteering. Using data from a Canadian national survey, we examine three dimensions of immigrant integration: professional, psychosocial and political. General volunteering is not significantly related to integration; however, there exists a relationship between the different dimensions of integration and where immigrants choose to volunteer. Thus, the relationship between the type and degree of immigrant integration and volunteering is nuanced; it matters where volunteering occurs.

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Although the literature on volunteering and wellbeing among older adults is extensive, it tends to focus on this relationship within spaces of formal volunteering, such as non-profit organisations. However, informal volunteering and other forms of civic engagement may also promote improved wellbeing outcomes for this age group; likewise, these behaviours may be linked to the practice of formal volunteering with an organisation. Drawing on data from the Delaware subsample of the Successful Aging Survey, this article examines whether differences in volunteer engagement influence the relationship between volunteering and wellbeing outcomes among older adults.

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We seek to understand how environmentalism is experienced, discussed and transmitted by South Korean families in the context of changing economic and environmental circumstances. Qualitative interviews with three-generation Korean families are used, in a country characterised in the past fifty years by rapid economic changes alongside continuation of traditional collectivistic social structures. We emphasise the family unit as an arena for the transmission of cultural dispositions, routines, habits and practices across generations. Relying on social practice theoretical framing, our findings suggest that in a mix of continuity and change, family routines are translated into complementing centripetal and centrifugal forces to encompass four themes: transmission processes, routinising of cultural habits, top-down intergenerational transmission with shifting motivations, and top-down intergenerational transmission with declining involvement. We discuss these findings in light of the theoretical heuristic of environmental habitus.

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