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  • Author or Editor: Fergal Finnegan x
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The chapter explores the impact of neoliberalism on Irish society and higher education (HE) and how this has been resisted. Taking a critical realist approach it seeks to analyse neoliberalism in HE in a way that is neither simplistic nor politically immobilising. It outlines the trajectory of neoliberal ideas in Ireland and their impact on higher education especially in the wake of the Great Recession. Most research on this topic neglects questions of agency and resistance. Thus, the main concern of the chapter is to document and analyse the various ways neoliberalism has been resisted in Irish higher education by staff, students and through social movement campaigns. It draws on mixed methods and qualitative research alongside documentary analysis for this purpose. The chapter concludes with reflections on how this resistance might be strengthened in the future by building alliances in order to reimagine the university.

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This book critically explores the funding arrangements governing contemporary community development and how they shape its theory and practice. The chapters consider the evolution of funding in community development, and how changes in policy and practice can be understood in relation to the politics of neoliberalism and contemporary efforts to build global democracy from the ‘bottom up’. Thematically, the book explores matters such as popular democracy, the shifting contours of the state–market relationship, prospects for democratising the state, the feasibility of community autonomy, the effects of managerialism, and hybrid modes of funding such as social finance. The book is positioned to stimulate critical debate on both policy and practice within the broad field of community development.

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This book critically explores the funding arrangements governing contemporary community development and how they shape its theory and practice. The chapters consider the evolution of funding in community development, and how changes in policy and practice can be understood in relation to the politics of neoliberalism and contemporary efforts to build global democracy from the ‘bottom up’. Thematically, the book explores matters such as popular democracy, the shifting contours of the state–market relationship, prospects for democratising the state, the feasibility of community autonomy, the effects of managerialism, and hybrid modes of funding such as social finance. The book is positioned to stimulate critical debate on both policy and practice within the broad field of community development.

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This book critically explores the funding arrangements governing contemporary community development and how they shape its theory and practice. The chapters consider the evolution of funding in community development, and how changes in policy and practice can be understood in relation to the politics of neoliberalism and contemporary efforts to build global democracy from the ‘bottom up’. Thematically, the book explores matters such as popular democracy, the shifting contours of the state–market relationship, prospects for democratising the state, the feasibility of community autonomy, the effects of managerialism, and hybrid modes of funding such as social finance. The book is positioned to stimulate critical debate on both policy and practice within the broad field of community development.

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This chapter presents an interview with Marcelo Lopes de Souza, a scholar who cooperates with social movements, and professor in the Department of Geography at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Drawing on the experiences of Latin American social movements, Marcelo discusses the implications of a commitment to radical autonomy for the funding of community-based movements and for emancipatory community development more broadly. Among the topics covered are the importance of ‘the commons’ in the life of communities; the role of ‘autonomous’ movements in community empowerment; the so-called ‘NGOisation’ of Latin American civil society and the extent to which this phenomenon has been a feature of the movements that Marcelo is familiar as well as its effects.

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This edited collection critically explores the funding arrangements governing contemporary community development and how they shape its theory and practice.

International contributions from activists, practitioners and academics consider the evolution of funding in community development and how changes in policy and practice can be understood in relation to the politics of neoliberalism and contemporary efforts to build global democracy from the ‘bottom up’.

Thematically, the collection explores matters such as popular democracy, the shifting contours of the state-market relationship, prospects for democratising the state, the feasibility of community autonomy, the effects of managerialism and hybrid modes of funding such as social finance.

The collection is thus uniquely positioned to stimulate critical debate on both policy and practice within the broad field of community development.

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This chapter sets out some of the most important themes across the book and illustrates why funding offers a powerful lens through which to ‘rethink’ community development in the current historical conjuncture. The first section unpacks the term ‘community development’ with reference to the varied conceptualisations deployed across the book. In particular, it draws attention to the importance of the widely shared democratic ‘ethic’, and to the inherent complexity of community development as a set of processes that call for a historical and social-spatial analysis of power. The second section expands on the analytical, political, and practice significance of funding. Finally, it highlights the three major cross-cutting themes of the collection: new configurations of power and governance; the role of the state in relation to democracy; and the complex connections between community development and egalitarian social change.

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