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’Race’, Ethnicity and Community Development
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In this unique global collection, Gary Craig and his contributors blend theory and practice-based case studies to review how different community development approaches can empower minority ethnic communities to confront racism and overcome social, economic and political disadvantage.

The book explores key questions about the empowerment and capacity-building of minority ethnic groups. Using case studies from across the ‘developed’ world, and in differing social and economic contexts, contributors explore these issues in working with asylum-seeker communities, addressing tensions between minorities and building alliances, in work with Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities, and using arts-based approaches.

The book will stimulate wider debates about the role of community development in relation to ‘race’ and ethnicity at a time when ‘race’ is being ‘invisibilised’ in public policy, and will be an invaluable resource for policy-makers, politicians, academics, and students from many disciplines.

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A contemporary reader
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Most slave trades were abolished during the 19th century yet there remain millions of people in slavery today, amongst them approximately 210 million children in slavery, trafficked, in debt bondage and other forms of forced labour. This groundbreaking book, drawing on experience worldwide, shows how children remain locked in slavery, the ways in which they are exploited and how they can be emancipated. Written for policy and political actors, academics and activists, it reminds us also that all are implicated in modern childhood slavery - as consumers - and need both to understand its causes, and act to stop it.

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Report Back provides news, views and reports from local government and the voluntary and community sectors. These reports are related, whenever possible, to the special theme of each issue of Benefits, but the most important consideration is their topicality and relevance to as wide an audience in these fields as possible. Benefits may commission pieces for particular themes but individual contributions are welcomed from those working in these areas and should be sent to the Editorial Office. These contributions might focus on either local government or the voluntary and community sectors, or on relationships between the two.

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This is a review of the UK black and minority ethnic (BME) third sector that has emerged since the 1950s, identifying research and policy issues facing the sector now. The sector has been marginalised both in relation to welfare policy as a whole but also within the third sector more specifically. The BME ‘voice’ is now, at a time of severe financial pressure but growing needs, in danger of disappearing.

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This chapter examines the experience of those who enter the European Union (EU) and associated states from outside the EU who are typically characterised by skin colour, culture and first language distinct from that of the majority ‘host’ population. The chapter begins with general remarks on demographic characteristics and origins of ethnic minorities in sample European countries. This is followed by a review of the ethnicity data which is publicly available in these countries which are grouped into greater and smaller minority populations. Although this sample is not strictly representative, there seems to be no reason to believe that the conclusions drawn from this review are not equally apposite to those countries not represented here. Much of the discussions in this chapter are concerned with general issues of labour market access for minority ethnic groups, although specific data is alluded to in relation to the experience of young people. Some of the topics discussed herein include: citizenship and settlement; poverty, ethnicity and exclusion; and ethnicity and local labour markets.

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This chapter summarises key themes and presents some final thoughts. It argues that there will be occasions when community workers armed with the values of social justice, of whatever ethnic origin, should have no option but to intervene to promote those values. Too often, community workers, social workers, the police, and others have veered away from facing difficult issues within the community for fear of being labelled as racist. Culture is not in itself good, and the acid test should be one of fundamental human rights: does a culture impinge on the human rights of its members? Does it challenge the core values of social justice? Community workers have to arm themselves with these core values in theory and in practice. In the turmoil and confusions of cross-cultural work, and in a context of ever-increasing and more violent forms of racism, this remains their clearest and most important line of defence.

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This introductory chapter first sets out the book’s aims, which are to help to fill a substantial gap in the literature on community development work; to outline the history and theory of community development work with minority groups; to explore, through case studies from different parts of the world, how different approaches to community development work can empower minority ethnic communities to overcome social disadvantage; and to encourage a wider debate and writing about this area of work. The chapter then provides an overarching historical, theoretical, and political context for the detailed analyses and accounts of local work that follow. This is important because community workers are now increasingly struggling at the local level against political, social, and economic trends generated at the global level, making their work more difficult but more urgent than ever before.

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This book blends theory and practice-based case studies to review how different community development approaches can empower minority ethnic communities to confront racism and overcome social, economic, and political disadvantage. The book explores key questions about the empowerment and capacity-building of minority ethnic groups. Using case studies from across the ‘developed’ world, and in differing social and economic contexts, the book explores these issues in working with asylum-seeker communities, addressing tensions between minorities and building alliances, in work with Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities, and using arts-based approaches. The book will stimulate wider debates about the role of community development in relation to ‘race’ and ethnicity at a time when ‘race’ is being ‘invisibilised’ in public policy, and will be an invaluable resource for policy-makers, politicians, academics, and students from many disciplines.

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