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  • Author or Editor: Jon Shaw x
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This book shows that transport matters. Comprising a series of highly accessible chapters written by respected experts, it reviews key transport issues and explains how and why effective and efficient transport is fundamental to successfully addressing all manner of public policy goals.

Contributors explore how we ‘do’ transport, as a result of the technologies available to us and the cultures surrounding how we use them, and examine how this has significant social, economic and environmental consequences. They also provide key recommendations for how we could do things differently to bring about a happier, healthier and more economically secure future for all of us.

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Ten years of ‘sustainable’ transport in the UK
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This informed and lively book offers a timely analysis of the UK government’s sustainable - or subsequently ‘integrated’ - transport policy 10 years after the publication of “A New Deal for Transport: Better for Everyone”. Written by prominent transport experts and with a foreword by Christian Wolmar, the book identifies the modest successes and, sadly, the far more significant failures in government policy over the last decade. The authors also uncover why it has proved so difficult to adopt a more sustainable approach to transport and break Britain’s love-affair with the car.

The book reviews the links between the idea of sustainability and transport policy, and provides an up-to-the-minute analysis of the political realities surrounding the delivery of a sustainable transport agenda in the UK. It picks up on the principal components of “A New Deal for Transport” and evaluates to what extent these have, or haven’t, been delivered in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. The contributors analyse why delivering sustainable transport policies seems to present particular difficulties to ministers across the UK, and considers the UK’s experience in an international perspective. The book draws lessons from the last 10 years in order to better inform future policy development.

“Traffic Jam” is an indispensable analysis of the difficulties involved in turning policy ideals into practical reality, and as such will be of interest to scholars, students, planners, policy analysts and policy makers.

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This is a book about the importance of transport, travel and mobility in modern society. The authors undertake a detailed review not just of key issues that are significant within the transport sector, but also of how and why transport is significant in addressing other policy goals. There are three main areas of focus: a) How we ‘do’ transport, as a result of available technologies and how we use them, b) How the ways in which we ‘do’ transport have certain consequences, across a wide range of policy areas, and c) How we could do things differently, to bring about different consequences. The book contains 16 chapters, each of which focuses on a specific theme. They have been edited together to demonstrate why and how, as a key part of a wider and connected approach to public policy, a better transport system will result not just in better journey experiences, but will also improve economic, environmental and social wellbeing. The book draws largely but not exclusively on examples from Great Britain, but has international relevance because the fundamental issues hold true across the developed world, notwithstanding different local contexts.

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This is a book about the importance of transport, travel and mobility in modern society. The authors undertake a detailed review not just of key issues that are significant within the transport sector, but also of how and why transport is significant in addressing other policy goals. There are three main areas of focus: a) How we ‘do’ transport, as a result of available technologies and how we use them, b) How the ways in which we ‘do’ transport have certain consequences, across a wide range of policy areas, and c) How we could do things differently, to bring about different consequences. The book contains 16 chapters, each of which focuses on a specific theme. They have been edited together to demonstrate why and how, as a key part of a wider and connected approach to public policy, a better transport system will result not just in better journey experiences, but will also improve economic, environmental and social wellbeing. The book draws largely but not exclusively on examples from Great Britain, but has international relevance because the fundamental issues hold true across the developed world, notwithstanding different local contexts.

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This is a book about the importance of transport, travel and mobility in modern society. The authors undertake a detailed review not just of key issues that are significant within the transport sector, but also of how and why transport is significant in addressing other policy goals. There are three main areas of focus: a) How we ‘do’ transport, as a result of available technologies and how we use them, b) How the ways in which we ‘do’ transport have certain consequences, across a wide range of policy areas, and c) How we could do things differently, to bring about different consequences. The book contains 16 chapters, each of which focuses on a specific theme. They have been edited together to demonstrate why and how, as a key part of a wider and connected approach to public policy, a better transport system will result not just in better journey experiences, but will also improve economic, environmental and social wellbeing. The book draws largely but not exclusively on examples from Great Britain, but has international relevance because the fundamental issues hold true across the developed world, notwithstanding different local contexts.

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This book offers a timely analysis of the UK government’s sustainable – or subsequently ‘integrated’ – transport policy ten years after the publication of ‘A New Deal for Transport: Better for Everyone’. It identifies the modest successes and, sadly, the far-more-significant failures in government policy over the last decade. The book also uncovers why it has proved so difficult to adopt a more sustainable approach to transport and break Britain’s love affair with the car. It reviews the links between the idea of sustainability and transport policy, and provides an up-to-the-minute analysis of the political realities surrounding the delivery of a sustainable transport agenda in the UK. The book picks up on the principal components of ‘A New Deal for Transport’ and evaluates to what extent these have, or have not, been delivered in England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. The chapters analyse why delivering sustainable transport policies seems to present particular difficulties to ministers across the UK, and considers the UK’s experience in an international perspective. The book draws lessons from the last ten years in order to better inform future policy development.

Restricted access

This book offers a timely analysis of the UK government’s sustainable – or subsequently ‘integrated’ – transport policy ten years after the publication of ‘A New Deal for Transport: Better for Everyone’. It identifies the modest successes and, sadly, the far-more-significant failures in government policy over the last decade. The book also uncovers why it has proved so difficult to adopt a more sustainable approach to transport and break Britain’s love affair with the car. It reviews the links between the idea of sustainability and transport policy, and provides an up-to-the-minute analysis of the political realities surrounding the delivery of a sustainable transport agenda in the UK. The book picks up on the principal components of ‘A New Deal for Transport’ and evaluates to what extent these have, or have not, been delivered in England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. The chapters analyse why delivering sustainable transport policies seems to present particular difficulties to ministers across the UK, and considers the UK’s experience in an international perspective. The book draws lessons from the last ten years in order to better inform future policy development.

Restricted access

This book offers a timely analysis of the UK government’s sustainable – or subsequently ‘integrated’ – transport policy ten years after the publication of ‘A New Deal for Transport: Better for Everyone’. It identifies the modest successes and, sadly, the far-more-significant failures in government policy over the last decade. The book also uncovers why it has proved so difficult to adopt a more sustainable approach to transport and break Britain’s love affair with the car. It reviews the links between the idea of sustainability and transport policy, and provides an up-to-the-minute analysis of the political realities surrounding the delivery of a sustainable transport agenda in the UK. The book picks up on the principal components of ‘A New Deal for Transport’ and evaluates to what extent these have, or have not, been delivered in England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. The chapters analyse why delivering sustainable transport policies seems to present particular difficulties to ministers across the UK, and considers the UK’s experience in an international perspective. The book draws lessons from the last ten years in order to better inform future policy development.

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This chapter explains the coverage of this book, which is about the developments in the transport sector in Great Britain. The book critically analyses transport developments in the UK in the 10 years following the publication of A New Deal for Transport in 1998. It argues that people should pay the true external costs of their travel choices, transport policy should reduce the need for mobility through active planning and management, and the government should ensure that regulation and concerted investment produces excellent infrastructure and service provision.

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We begin by considering why, how and how much transport matters, both in itself and in relation to a whole host of public policy areas including economic development, social inclusion, health and wellbeing, (im)migration, education, crime / law and order, housing and the environment. We set out and explain the aim of the book, and provide an overview of transport policy over the last 50 years by way of context for a summary of what follows in the remainder of the book. We conclude by considering key themes that emerged in authors’ discussions during the process of putting the book together.

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