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This chapter explores the idea of reparation through pedagogy. It draws on experiences across the Education, Justice and Memory network (EdJAM), which supports creative approaches to teaching and learning about past violence and injustice, supporting 25 projects in 13 countries led by educators, artists, activists and heritage-sector professionals. Using examples from EdJAM’s practice, the chapter describes features of reparative pedagogy as: dignifying, truth-telling, multiplicitous, responsible and creative. It illustrates these as petals of a flower; beautiful in their own right but working together to create something more. Conceptualizing pedagogy as reparative adds to theorizing around material, symbolic, epistemic and affective reparation and also recognizes the existing creative work that educators and students are doing towards reparation despite considerable odds.

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This book explores the connections between sustainable futures and demands to decolonize education; conversations that often occur separately, despite their interdependencies. The idea of sustainable futures lies at the heart of contemporary education and development agendas, including UNESCO’s Futures of Education initiative, which aims to reimagine how knowledge and learning can shape the future of humanity and the planet by equipping learners with diverse ways of being and knowing. Yet, much of the knowledge, values and skills in formal education continues to be Eurocentric, and many education systems maintain colonial legacies of exclusion and violence. Protests, including those led by the Black Lives Matter, Rhodes Must Fall, Indigenous and other anti-colonial, anti-racist social movements, have called for education to be decolonized and for diverse knowledge systems, languages and values to be the basis for realizing equitable and sustainable futures. These demands have become accentuated by multiple crises, including the Covid-19 pandemic.

The book looks at the journey towards decolonization and sustainable futures from theoretical and practitioner perspectives: introducing concepts that underpin debates about decolonized futures; bringing to the fore the epistemic injustice in the exclusion and marginalization of non-Western knowledge systems, languages and value systems; and exploring different approaches to praxis in schools, universities and society. It also develops a call for reparative futures, highlighting the need for acknowledgement and repair of past injustice and violence in order to build dignified and inclusive futures for all.

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This book explores the connections between sustainable futures and demands to decolonize education; conversations that often occur separately, despite their interdependencies. The idea of sustainable futures lies at the heart of contemporary education and development agendas, including UNESCO’s Futures of Education initiative, which aims to reimagine how knowledge and learning can shape the future of humanity and the planet by equipping learners with diverse ways of being and knowing. Yet, much of the knowledge, values and skills in formal education continues to be Eurocentric, and many education systems maintain colonial legacies of exclusion and violence. Protests, including those led by the Black Lives Matter, Rhodes Must Fall, Indigenous and other anti-colonial, anti-racist social movements, have called for education to be decolonized and for diverse knowledge systems, languages and values to be the basis for realizing equitable and sustainable futures. These demands have become accentuated by multiple crises, including the Covid-19 pandemic.

The book looks at the journey towards decolonization and sustainable futures from theoretical and practitioner perspectives: introducing concepts that underpin debates about decolonized futures; bringing to the fore the epistemic injustice in the exclusion and marginalization of non-Western knowledge systems, languages and value systems; and exploring different approaches to praxis in schools, universities and society. It also develops a call for reparative futures, highlighting the need for acknowledgement and repair of past injustice and violence in order to build dignified and inclusive futures for all.

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This book explores the connections between sustainable futures and demands to decolonize education; conversations that often occur separately, despite their interdependencies. The idea of sustainable futures lies at the heart of contemporary education and development agendas, including UNESCO’s Futures of Education initiative, which aims to reimagine how knowledge and learning can shape the future of humanity and the planet by equipping learners with diverse ways of being and knowing. Yet, much of the knowledge, values and skills in formal education continues to be Eurocentric, and many education systems maintain colonial legacies of exclusion and violence. Protests, including those led by the Black Lives Matter, Rhodes Must Fall, Indigenous and other anti-colonial, anti-racist social movements, have called for education to be decolonized and for diverse knowledge systems, languages and values to be the basis for realizing equitable and sustainable futures. These demands have become accentuated by multiple crises, including the Covid-19 pandemic.

The book looks at the journey towards decolonization and sustainable futures from theoretical and practitioner perspectives: introducing concepts that underpin debates about decolonized futures; bringing to the fore the epistemic injustice in the exclusion and marginalization of non-Western knowledge systems, languages and value systems; and exploring different approaches to praxis in schools, universities and society. It also develops a call for reparative futures, highlighting the need for acknowledgement and repair of past injustice and violence in order to build dignified and inclusive futures for all.

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Bringing together the perspectives of researchers, policy makers, activists, educators and practitioners, this book critically interrogates the Western-centric assumptions underpinning education and development agendas and the colonial legacies of violence they often uphold.

The book considers the crucial connection between the idea of sustainable futures and the demand to decolonise education. Containing an innovative mixture of text, stories and poetry, it explores how decolonised futures can be conceived and enacted, offering theoretical and practical examples, including from practice in educational and cultural organisations. In doing so, the book highlights education’s potential role in facilitating processes of reparative justice that can contribute to decolonised futures.

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This concluding chapter reflects on the value of connecting discussions around sustainable futures and decolonization. Drawing together the three parts of the book, and considering the journey from seminar series to publication, the chapter explores fruitful avenues, challenges and paths worthy of future research and dialogue.

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This introductory chapter sets out the background to the book. It locates the volume in relation to contemporary debates about sustainable futures and decolonizing education and to existing initiatives, including sustainable development goals and the UNESCO Futures of Education initiative. The chapter presents the aims of the collection and provides an overview of each section in the book, including a summary of the key ideas and arguments that will be developed by the chapter authors.

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In spring 2021, during the COVID-19 pandemic, research projects funded by the UK’s Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) were subjected to budget cuts. The cuts were the result of UK government’s decision to reduce its Official Development Assistance (ODA), which had devastating effects for humanitarian, development and research work. This article draws on focus group discussions with project teams working on three large GCRF-funded projects to explore the effects of these cuts. The article documents how the cuts curtailed project aspirations and impact, had a negative toll on the mental health of researchers, and imperilled the trusting relationships upon which international research collaborations are built. The article argues that the cuts expose the shallow commitments to research ethics and equitable partnerships of powerful actors in the UK research ecosystem, including research councils and government. In ‘doing harm’ via these cuts, the article explores the failure of research governance structures and the continued coloniality underpinning the UK’s approach to researching ‘global challenges’.

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A Decolonial Perspective

This short book aims to provide a decolonial critique of dominant global agendas concerning teacher professionalism and to propose new understanding based on the perspectives and experiences of a sample of teachers in Colombia, Ethiopia, India, Rwanda and Tanzania. The book opens by setting out dominant conceptions of teacher professionalism as they appear in the global literature. It then uses Ndlovu-Gatsheni’s three dimensions of coloniality (namely, the coloniality of power, of knowledge and of being) as a framework for considering the legacy of colonialism on teacher professionalism and setting out teachers’ ideas concerning the barriers to and affordances of their professionalism. The main arguments advanced in the book are that a decolonial lens is helpful for contextualizing the perspectives of teachers in the global South; the lived experiences and material conditions of these teachers are often neglected in dominant discourses; it is important to situate the perspectives of teachers in an understanding of local contexts and realities; and, in contrast to deficit discourses that predominate in the global literature, there is much that can be learned about teacher professionalism from teachers in the global South.

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The chapter situates the study with a review of the relevant global literature. It starts by defining teacher professionalism, and then reviews dominant approaches to understanding teacher professionalism, including a rights-based approach championed by UNESCO, a management-driven approach advocated by the World Bank and a social justice approach. The study is situated between a rights-based and critical approach.

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