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Author: Kathryn Almack

‘Family’ is an important concept in end-of-life care policy and practice but familial relationships are rarely considered, beyond a bio-medical framework and/or as a resource for informal care. Furthermore, bereavement and grief have largely come to be seen as the domain for psychiatry and psychology. I argue for an exploration of death, dying and bereavement as experiences within which everyday family practices are embedded and enacted. In doing so, I draw on experiences, in an English setting, relating to my parents’ coming to the end of their lives. Morgan’s work is central to this endeavour and I apply aspects of his work to this important but understudied area of family sociology. Building on insights from this important body of work, I argue this can help to develop richer, more nuanced understandings of the everyday familial experiences of dying and death bound up in social, material and cultural contexts.

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Multidisciplinary International Perspectives

Available Open Access under CC-BY-NC licence. With an increasingly diverse ageing population, we need to expand our understanding of how social divisions intersect to affect outcomes in later life.

This edited collection examines ageing, gender, and sexualities from multidisciplinary and geographically diverse perspectives and looks at how these factors combine with other social divisions to affect experiences of ageing. It draws on theory and empirical data to provide both conceptual knowledge and clear ‘real-world’ illustrations.

The book includes section introductions to guide the reader through the debates and ideas and a glossary offering clear definitions of key terms and concepts.

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This chapter explores issues relating to end of life care for LGBT people. Existing research is presented with the recognition that there are gaps and that there is only limited evidence to support social work practice in this area. Wider issues of stigma, discrimination and marginalisation are noted for their impact on the social determinants of health and experiences of minority stress. It is also acknowledged that LGBT people may be unwilling to disclose their sexual orientation or reluctant to seek services. The experiences of LGBT people in accessing end-of-life care in the UK are explored using material from research undertaken by the authors, with reference to some of the challenges that may be encountered when seeking support and accessing services, the use of supportive networks and issues of bereavement and loss. The importance of supporting LGBT workers, friends and family is highlighted. The chapter emphasises the need to look at the whole person without heterosexist assumptions and to respect each individual’s life story. The opening vignette is used to raise a number of questions regarding social work practice.

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This chapter dwells on disruptions of normative time, on what is done ‘at the right time’, and by whom. It empirically situates ‘intersections’ of age, sexuality and gender, as bringing forward certain subjects, while rendering others out of time, backwards, behind and redundant. Sexualities research is replete with metaphors of ‘coming of age’ and, with the passing of Equalities legislation, may well be seen as a discipline that has itself, ‘got on’ or ‘arrived’. Yet only certain gendered and sexual subjects are constructed as on time, planned alongside work-life balance, situated against anticipated life-course trajectories, and as endorsed in social policies, institutional practice and normative imaginings. I draw on concepts from Bourdieu, and ideas of ‘queer temporalities’, to explore how (non)normative personhood is produced and ruptured. I locate myself in and through research, as inevitably intersecting my own cares, biography, personal and professional identity (as also a queer subject ‘getting on’).

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This chapter explores the intersections of gender, sexuality and age through transgender aging. Using empirical work from both Swedish and U.S. contexts, it examines how heteronormative expectations for human lives are challenged by the identities, lived experiences and life choices of older transgender adults. Further, the chapter draws upon life course and queer perspectives to analyse the role of community-level organizing and resistance as pathways to wellness in later life for transgender people

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This opening chapter details how this book emerged and developed, its key themes and structure. In so doing, the chapter will discuss intersectionality, multi-disciplinarity and why this is a timely and important edited collection. The chapter discusses how it is important that the intersections of ageing, gender and sexualities are considered together, alongside other sources of social division and identity.

Open access

With an increasingly diverse ageing population, we need to expand our understanding of how social divisions intersect to affect outcomes in later life. This edited collection examines ageing, gender and sexualities from multidisciplinary and geographically diverse perspectives and looks at how these factors combine with other social divisions to affect experiences of ageing. It draws on theory and empirical data to provide both conceptual knowledge and clear ‘real-world’ illustrations, and includes section introductions to guide the reader through the debates and ideas.

Open access

With an increasingly diverse ageing population, we need to expand our understanding of how social divisions intersect to affect outcomes in later life. This edited collection examines ageing, gender and sexualities from multidisciplinary and geographically diverse perspectives and looks at how these factors combine with other social divisions to affect experiences of ageing. It draws on theory and empirical data to provide both conceptual knowledge and clear ‘real-world’ illustrations, and includes section introductions to guide the reader through the debates and ideas.

Open access

With an increasingly diverse ageing population, we need to expand our understanding of how social divisions intersect to affect outcomes in later life. This edited collection examines ageing, gender and sexualities from multidisciplinary and geographically diverse perspectives and looks at how these factors combine with other social divisions to affect experiences of ageing. It draws on theory and empirical data to provide both conceptual knowledge and clear ‘real-world’ illustrations, and includes section introductions to guide the reader through the debates and ideas.

Open access

With an increasingly diverse ageing population, we need to expand our understanding of how social divisions intersect to affect outcomes in later life. This edited collection examines ageing, gender and sexualities from multidisciplinary and geographically diverse perspectives and looks at how these factors combine with other social divisions to affect experiences of ageing. It draws on theory and empirical data to provide both conceptual knowledge and clear ‘real-world’ illustrations, and includes section introductions to guide the reader through the debates and ideas.

Open access